Dancing with the Enemy: The Gripping Story of the Jewish Dance Instructor Who Survived Auschwitz by Teaching Dance to the N by Paul GlaserDancing with the Enemy: The Gripping Story of the Jewish Dance Instructor Who Survived Auschwitz by Teaching Dance to the N by Paul Glaser

Dancing with the Enemy: The Gripping Story of the Jewish Dance Instructor Who Survived Auschwitz by…

byPaul Glaser

Paperback | May 12, 2015

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“An extraordinary story of an unconventional, nervy woman and her determination to survive.” —The New York Post

Paul Glaser was an adult when he learned the truth about his heritage. Raised in a devout Roman Catholic home in the Netherlands, he had never known his father was Jewish and that their family had suffered great losses during the World War II. When Paul inquired, his father refused to provide details about the war, the camps, and especially Rosie, Paul’s estranged aunt.

Shortly after this discovery, Paul started an investigation into his family’s past, desperate to get to the bottom of the long-standing rift between his father and Rosie. His research led him to a collection of Rosie’s wartime diaries, photographs, and letters, which told the dramatic story of a woman who was caught up in the tragic sweep of World War II.
Rosie Glaser was a magnificent woman; despite everything, she remained hopeful, exuberant, and, most importantly, cunning. When the Nazis seized power, Rosie, a nonpracticing Jew, entered dangerous territory, managing a hidden dance school and participating in whispered conversations and secret rendezvous. She was eventually caught and sent to a series of concentration camps.

She survived, though, in part by giving dance and etiquette lessons to her captors, who favored her and looked out for her in return. Of the twelve hundred people who arrived with her in Auschwitz, only eight survived.

Dancing with the Enemy recalls an extraordinary life marked by love, betrayal, and fierce determination.
Paul Glaser was born in the Netherlands shortly after World War II. He has held management positions in a number of educational and healthcare institutions and has been involved in the establishment of a historical printing museum, a regional theater, and a Montessori secondary school. He resides in Enschede, Netherlands.
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Title:Dancing with the Enemy: The Gripping Story of the Jewish Dance Instructor Who Survived Auschwitz by…Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1 inPublished:May 12, 2015Publisher:Skyhorse Publishing Inc.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1632205815

ISBN - 13:9781632205810

Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Mixed feelings The book is unique in that it includes a number of Rosie's own writings, including diary entries, poems, letters and some photos. I found the photos to be the best part. The portion of the book about the author's discovery of his family history was a bit dry, and I skimmed some of that. It's a difficult book to rate is some ways because Rosie is not a particularly likeable character. I kept thinking "Why wouldn't she have gone into hiding when she was "betrayed" (reported on to the SS) the first time?! Or the second time?!" She knew that she would be sent to Auschwitz, and the tone of the book and her own writing paints her as a vain woman who thought she was fearless she was and how much men desired her. She seemed to take pride in sleeping with various SS officers, enjoying that they apparently desired her. It's not at all portrayed as something she was forced to do, or did to survive. Other aspects of her store are gross exaggerations.
Date published: 2018-05-06
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Mixed feelings The book is unique in that it includes a number of Rosie's own writings, including diary entries, poems, letters and some photos. I found the photos to be the best part. The portion of the book about the author's discovery of his family history was a bit dry, and I skimmed some of that. It's a difficult book to rate is some ways because Rosie is not a particularly likeable character. I kept thinking "Why wouldn't she have gone into hiding when she was "betrayed" (reported on to the SS) the first time?! Or the second time?!" She knew that she would be sent to Auschwitz, and the tone of the book and her own writing paints her as a vain woman who thought she was fearless she was and how much men desired her. She seemed to take pride in sleeping with various SS officers, enjoying that they apparently desired her. It's not at all portrayed as something she was forced to do, or did to survive. Other aspects of her store are gross exaggerations.
Date published: 2018-05-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Eyes for our time Paul Glaser weaves his Aunt Rosie's personal memoir of surviving the holocaust with his own search for his family roots into a compelling account of what it was like to live in and survive the death camps. Rosie's voice is credible, realistic, youthful and observant. While being a 'good read,' the book still manages to be highly informative and to provide the reader with an insight into the lives of survivors but also an insight into the intergenerational relationships between survivors and their families. Rosie's post holocaust signature has changed forever the way I look at the letter 'R.'
Date published: 2013-10-30