Daughters Of Isis: Women Of Ancient Egypt by Joyce A. TyldesleyDaughters Of Isis: Women Of Ancient Egypt by Joyce A. Tyldesley

Daughters Of Isis: Women Of Ancient Egypt

byJoyce A. Tyldesley

Paperback | September 1, 1995

Pricing and Purchase Info

$18.60 online 
$23.00 list price save 19%
Earn 93 plum® points
Quantity:

Ships within 1-2 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In ancient Egypt women enjoyed a legal, social and sexual independence unrivalled by their Greek or Roman sisters, or in fact by most women until the late nineteenth century. They could own and trade in property, work outside the home, marry foreigners and live alone without the protection of a male guardian. Some of them even rose to rule Egypt as ‘female kings’. Joyce Tyldesley’s vivid history of how women lived in ancient Egypt weaves a fascinating picture of daily life – marriage and the home, work and play, grooming and religion – viewed from a female perspective, in a work that is engaging, original and constantly surprising.
Joyce Tyldesley, holder of a doctorate from Oxford University, is Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics, and Oriental Studies at Liverpool University, England. She is the author of Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh and Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Eygpt.
Loading
Title:Daughters Of Isis: Women Of Ancient EgyptFormat:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.1 × 5.4 × 0.9 inPublished:September 1, 1995Publisher:Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140175962

ISBN - 13:9780140175967

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Daughters of IsisList of Plates
List of Figures
List of Maps and Chronologies
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Geographical and Historical Background
1. Images of Women
2. Married Bliss
3. Mistress of the House
4. Work and Play
5. Good Grooming
6. The Royal Harem
7. Female Kings
8. Religious Life and Death
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index

From Our Editors

During the dynastic period (3000 BC - 332 BC), as the Greek historian Herodotus was intrigued to observe, Egyptian women enjoyed a legal, social and sexual independence unrivalled by their Greek or Roman sisters, unrivalled, indeed, by women in Europe until the late nineteenth century. They could own and trade in property, work outside the home, marry foreigners and even live alone without the protection of a male guardian. Furthermore, women fortunate enough to be members of the royal harem were vastly influential, as were those rare women who rose to rule Egypt as 'female kings'. Joyce Tyldesley draws upon archaeological, historical and ethnographical evidence to piece together a vivid picture of daily life in Egypt - marriage and the home, work and play, grooming, religion - all viewed from a female perspective. She has an engaging eye for incidental detail and draws fascinating parallels and contrasts between the ancient and our modern world.