Dearest Beloved: The Hawthornes and the Making of the Middle-Class Family by T. Walter HerbertDearest Beloved: The Hawthornes and the Making of the Middle-Class Family by T. Walter Herbert

Dearest Beloved: The Hawthornes and the Making of the Middle-Class Family

byT. Walter Herbert, Walter T. Herbert

Paperback | March 7, 1995

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The marriage of Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne—for their contemporaries a model of true love and married happiness—was also a scene of revulsion and combat. T. Walter Herbert reveals the tragic conflicts beneath the Hawthorne's ideal of domestic fulfillment and shows how their marriage reflected the tensions within nineteenth-century society. In so doing, he sheds new light on Hawthorne's fiction, with its obsessive themes of guilt and grief, balked feminism and homosexual seduction, adultery, patricide, and incest.
T. Walter Herbert is University Scholar and Brown Professor of English at Southwestern University. He is the author of Moby-Dick and Calvinism: A World Dismantled (1977) and Marquesan Encounters: Melville and the Meaning of Civilization (1980).
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Title:Dearest Beloved: The Hawthornes and the Making of the Middle-Class FamilyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:331 pages, 8.75 × 6.35 × 0.68 inPublished:March 7, 1995Publisher:University of California Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0520201558

ISBN - 13:9780520201552

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"A stimulating and important book that helps us better understand the social construction of gender in nineteenth-century America."--Joan D. Hedrick, "Women's Review of Books