Death So Noble: Memory, Meaning, and the First World War by Jonathan F. VanceDeath So Noble: Memory, Meaning, and the First World War by Jonathan F. Vance

Death So Noble: Memory, Meaning, and the First World War

byJonathan F. Vance, William Vance

Paperback | January 15, 1999

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This book examines Canada's collective memory of the First World War through the 1920s and 1930s beginning with the Armistice in 1918. This book deals with cultural history more than military history and looks at art, music and literature during World War I.

Comparable to Modris Eskteins' Rites of Spring and Paul Fussell's The Great War and Modern Memory, the author draws on a broad range of sources, published and unpublished, making this book an original contribution to the growing literature dealing with World War I.

Thematically organized into such subjects as the symbolism of the soldier, the implications of war memory for Canadian nationalism and the idea of a just war, the book draws on military records, memoirs, war memorials, newspaper reports, fiction, popular songs, and films. In each case Vance draws a distinction between the objective realities of the war and the way that contemporaries remember it.

Death so Noble takes an unorthodox look at the Canadian war experience. It views the Great War as a cultural and philosophical force rather than as a political and military event. It will be of interest to specialists in First World War history and literature as well as a general audience.

Jonathan Vance teaches in the Department of History at the University of Western Ontario. He is the author of Objects of Concern: Canadian Prisoners of War through the Twentieth Century (UBC Press, 1994).
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Title:Death So Noble: Memory, Meaning, and the First World WarFormat:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9 × 5.98 × 0.98 inPublished:January 15, 1999Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774806001

ISBN - 13:9780774806008

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from An excellent read for Canada's 150 Dr. Jonathan Vance explores the myth-making surrounding the First World War in death so noble introducing a new facet of consideration for military historians. His arguments are well-presented and it is a good display of historical empathy.
Date published: 2017-01-04

Table of Contents

1 The Just War

2 Christ in Flanders

3 O Death, Where Is Thy Sting?

4 Accurs'd They Were Not There

5 The Soldier as Canada

6 Safeguarding the Past

7 If Ye Break Faith

8 To Found a Country

Conclusion

Bibliographic Essay

From Our Editors

Wars often help shape a country's sense of itself. Indeed, such formations have taken place in the United States and Great Britain. In Death So Noble, historian Jonathan F. Vance, demonstrates how Canada consolidated as a country during and shortly after the First World War. Provocative and intelligent, this book demonstrates how Canadians across the land mourned the losses and cheered the victories of their soldiers during battle, and how they later commemorated the war when it was over. A critical and impressive look at how Canada came to forge a national identity.

Editorial Reviews

This book examines Canada's collective memory of the First World War through the 1920s and 1930s. It is a cultural history, considering art, music, and literature. Thematically organized into such subjects as the symbolism of the soldier, the implications of war memory for Canadian nationalism, and the idea of a just war, the book draws on military records, memoirs, war memorials, newspaper reports, fiction, popular songs, and films. It takes an unorthodox view of the Canadian war experience as a cultural and philosophical force rather than as a political and military event.This is a most impressive, sophisticated, and original contribution to Canadian historical writing ... written with verve and is a delight to read; it would not be excessive to rank it with the brilliant books by Fussell and Eksteins. - Carl Berger