Deciphering Global Epidemics: Analytical Approaches to the Disease Records of World Cities, 1888-1912 by Andrew CliffDeciphering Global Epidemics: Analytical Approaches to the Disease Records of World Cities, 1888-1912 by Andrew Cliff

Deciphering Global Epidemics: Analytical Approaches to the Disease Records of World Cities, 1888…

byAndrew Cliff, Peter Haggett, Matthew Smallman-Raynor

Paperback | August 28, 1998

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This book uses data collected in the American journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report for some 350 cities from around the world to look at trends in global mortality at the turn of the twentieth century, a period that witnessed some of the most dramatic changes in city growth on an international scale. The diseases considered are diphtheria, enteric fever, measles, scarlet fever, tuberculosis and whooping cough--as well as death from all causes. The data have never before been systematically analyzed and they give important insights into patterns of mortality from these diseases.
Title:Deciphering Global Epidemics: Analytical Approaches to the Disease Records of World Cities, 1888…Format:PaperbackDimensions:496 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 1.1 inPublished:August 28, 1998Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052147860X

ISBN - 13:9780521478601

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Table of Contents

List of figures; List of plates; List of tables; Foreword; Preface; 1. Prologue: epidemics past; 2. The nature of the evidence; 3. The global sample: an overall picture; 4. Epidemic trends: a global synthesis; 5. Comparing world regions; 6. The individual city record; 7. Epidemics: looking forwards; Appendices; References.

Editorial Reviews

"This work, which folds together the fields of geopgraphy, history, demography, economics, epidemiology, and public health (among others), is interdisciplinary history at its best." Kenneth F. Kiple, Journal of Interdisciplinary History