Decoding Chomsky: Science And Revolutionary Politics by Chris KnightDecoding Chomsky: Science And Revolutionary Politics by Chris Knight

Decoding Chomsky: Science And Revolutionary Politics

byChris Knight

Hardcover | September 27, 2016

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A fresh and fascinating look at the philosophies, politics, and intellectual legacy of one of the twentieth century’s most influential and controversial minds

Occupying a pivotal position in postwar thought, Noam Chomsky is both the founder of modern linguistics and the world’s most prominent political dissident. Chris Knight adopts an anthropologist’s perspective on the twin output of this intellectual giant, acclaimed as much for his denunciations of US foreign policy as for his theories about language and mind. Knight explores the social and institutional context of Chomsky’s thinking, showing how the tension between military funding and his role as linchpin of the political left pressured him to establish a disconnect between science on the one hand and politics on the other, deepening a split between mind and body characteristic of Western philosophy since the Enlightenment. Provocative, fearless, and engaging, this remarkable study explains the enigma of one of the greatest intellectuals of our time.
Chris Knight is currently senior research fellow in the department of anthropology at University College, London. He lives in London.
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Title:Decoding Chomsky: Science And Revolutionary PoliticsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.98 inPublished:September 27, 2016Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300221460

ISBN - 13:9780300221466

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"Knight says his ‘subversive intention’ is ‘to serve justice on Chomsky the scientist without doing an injustice to Chomsky the conscience of America.’ Now why should that be subversive? Any voice critical of Chomsky risks being dismissed as yet another right-wing defender of political orthodoxy, but given even the most superficial examination of Knight’s biography one could hardly question that he supports the substance of Chomsky’s views (as do I).  Nonetheless, he shows how Chomsky has acquiesced in – more than that, has participated in and abetted – a radical post-war transformation of the relation of science to society, legitimating one of the significant political achievements of the right, the pretense that science is apolitical."—Bruce Nevin, The Brooklyn Rail