Defining the Renaissance Virtuosa: Women Artists and the Language of Art History and Criticism by Fredrika H. JacobsDefining the Renaissance Virtuosa: Women Artists and the Language of Art History and Criticism by Fredrika H. Jacobs

Defining the Renaissance Virtuosa: Women Artists and the Language of Art History and Criticism

byFredrika H. Jacobs

Paperback | September 8, 1999

not yet rated|write a review

Pricing and Purchase Info

$63.36

Earn 317 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Defining the Renaissance "Virtuosa" considers the language of art in relationship to the issues of gender difference through an examination of art criticism written between 1550 and 1800 on approximately forty women artists who were active in Renaissance Italy. Fredrika Jacobs demonstrates how these theoretical writings defined women artists, by linking artistic creation and biological procreation. Jacobs' study shows how deeply the biases of these early critics have inflected both subsequent reception of these Renaissance virtuose, as well as modern scholarship.

Details & Specs

Title:Defining the Renaissance Virtuosa: Women Artists and the Language of Art History and CriticismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:244 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:September 8, 1999Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521664969

ISBN - 13:9780521664967

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Defining the Renaissance Virtuosa: Women Artists and the Language of Art History and Criticism

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. Problems of praise and Pythagorean contrariety; 3. (Pro)creativity; 4. Melancholia: a case study; 5. La donnesca mano; 6. Misplaced modifiers; 7. 'femmina masculo e masculo femmina'; Appendix I. A roster of sixteenth-century Italian women artists; Appendix II.

Editorial Reviews

"Thanks to the breadth of her textual analyses and the insightful questions she poses throughout, Jacobs offers a richly illuminating reading of the construction of the Renaissance woman artist. In turn, the book provides a welcome context for several worthy but more narrowly focused critical studies on related subjects whose contents she integrates into her own narrative....a considerable achievement in having uncovered and woven together a complex of ideas that expands consequentially our view of artistic activity in Early Modern Italy." Leslie Korrick, Sixteenth Century Jrnl