Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots Of Civil Rights 1919 To 1950 by Glenda Elizabeth GilmoreDefying Dixie: The Radical Roots Of Civil Rights 1919 To 1950 by Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore

Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots Of Civil Rights 1919 To 1950

byGlenda Elizabeth Gilmore

Paperback | July 28, 2009

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The civil rights movement that looms over the 1950s and 1960s was the tip of an iceberg, the legal and political remnant of a broad, raucous, deeply American movement for social justice that flourished from the 1920s through the 1940s. This rich history of that early movement introduces us to a contentious mix of home-grown radicals, labor activists, newspaper editors, black workers, and intellectuals who employed every strategy imaginable to take Dixie down. In a dramatic narrative Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore deftly shows how the movement unfolded against national and global developments, gaining focus and finally arriving at a narrow but effective legal strategy for securing desegregation and political rights.
Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore is the Peter V. and C. Vann Woodward Professor of History, African American Studies, and American Studies at Yale University. Her research interests include twentieth-century U.S. history; African American history since 1865; U.S. women's and gender history since 1865; history of the American South; and reform ...
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Title:Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots Of Civil Rights 1919 To 1950Format:PaperbackDimensions:640 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1.25 inPublished:July 28, 2009Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393335321

ISBN - 13:9780393335323

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Editorial Reviews

“Painstakingly researched and vividly told, Defying Dixie is, by any standard, a formidable achievement.” — Los Angeles Times

“Introduces scores of dedicated, colorful and sometimes eccentric dreamers and agitators.” — New York Times Book Review