Demosthenes, Speeches 50-59

Paperback | July 1, 2003

Translated byVictor Bers

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This is the sixth volume in the Oratory of Classical Greece. This series presents all of the surviving speeches from the late fifth and fourth centuries BC in new translations prepared by classical scholars who are at the forefront of the discipline. These translations are especially designed for the needs and interests of today's undergraduates, Greekless scholars in other disciplines, and the general public.

Classical oratory is an invaluable resource for the study of ancient Greek life and culture. The speeches offer evidence on Greek moral views, social and economic conditions, political and social ideology, law and legal procedure, and other aspects of Athenian culture that have been largely ignored: women and family life, slavery, and religion, to name just a few.

Demosthenes is regarded as the greatest orator of classical antiquity; indeed, his very eminence may be responsible for the inclusion under his name of a number of speeches he almost certainly did not write. This volume contains four speeches that are most probably the work of Apollodorus, who is often known as "the Eleventh Attic Orator." Regardless of their authorship, however, this set of ten law court speeches gives a vivid sense of public and private life in fourth-century BC Athens. They tell of the friendships and quarrels of rural neighbors, of young men joined in raucous, intentionally shocking behavior, of families enduring great poverty, and of the intricate involvement of prostitutes in the lives of citizens. They also deal with the outfitting of warships, the grain trade, challenges to citizenship, and restrictions on the civic role of men in debt to the state.

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This is the sixth volume in the Oratory of Classical Greece. This series presents all of the surviving speeches from the late fifth and fourth centuries BC in new translations prepared by classical scholars who are at the forefront of the discipline. These translations are especially designed for the needs and interests of today's unde...

Demosthenes, the orator, is said to have had to conquer an originally ineffective vocal delivery. After years of private law practice, he delivered the first of his three Philippics against Philip of Macedon in 351 B.C. He saw danger to Athens in the tyrannical expansion of the Macedonian state, but his passionate and compelling exhort...

other books by Victor Bers

Format:PaperbackDimensions:237 pages, 8.45 × 5.47 × 0.52 inPublished:July 1, 2003Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292709226

ISBN - 13:9780292709225

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Table of Contents

Series Editor's Preface (Michael Gagarin)Translator's Preface (Victor Bers)Series Introduction (Michael Gagarin) Oratory in Classical Athens The Orators The Works of the Orators Government and Law in Classical Athens The Translation of Greek Oratory Abbreviations Note on Currency Bibliography of Works CitedDEMOSTHENESIntroduction to Demosthenes (Michael Gagarin) Life Works Style Significance Supplementary BibliographyIntroduction to This Volume (Victor Bers) Apollodorus Text50. Against Polycles51. On the Trierarchic Crown52. Against Callippus53. Against Nicostratus54. Against Conon55. Against Callicles56. Against Dionysodorus57. Against Eubulides58. Against Theocrines59. Against NeaeraIndex