Derrida And The Inheritance Of Democracy

Paperback | May 27, 2013

bySamir Haddad

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Derrida and the Inheritance of Democracy provides a theoretically rich and accessible account of Derrida's political philosophy. Demonstrating the key role inheritance plays in Derrida's thinking, Samir Haddad develops a general theory of inheritance and shows how it is essential to democratic action. He transforms Derrida's well-known idea of "democracy to come" into active engagement with democratic traditions. Haddad focuses on issues such as hospitality, justice, normativity, violence, friendship, birth, and the nature of democracy as he reads these deeply political writings.

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Derrida and the Inheritance of Democracy provides a theoretically rich and accessible account of Derrida's political philosophy. Demonstrating the key role inheritance plays in Derrida's thinking, Samir Haddad develops a general theory of inheritance and shows how it is essential to democratic action. He transforms Derrida's well-known...

Samir Haddad is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University.

other books by Samir Haddad

Format:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.6 inPublished:May 27, 2013Publisher:Indiana University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0253008417

ISBN - 13:9780253008411

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Abbreviations

Introduction: Derrida's Legacies

1. The Structure of Aporia

2. Derridean Inheritance

3. Inheriting Democracy to Come

4. Questioning Normativity

5. Politics of Friendship as Democratic Inheritance

6. Inheriting Birth

Conclusion: Inheriting Derrida's Legacies

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

"Haddad lays out with unprecedented clarity some key features of Derrida's later thinking on several crucial ethical and political matters, including the very widely misunderstood issue of 'unconditional hospitality.'" -Geoffrey Bennington, Emory University