Descriptive Handbook Of The Cape Colony; Its Condition And Resources: Its Condition and Resources by John NobleDescriptive Handbook Of The Cape Colony; Its Condition And Resources: Its Condition and Resources by John Noble

Descriptive Handbook Of The Cape Colony; Its Condition And Resources: Its Condition and Resources

byJohn Noble

Paperback | February 5, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875. Excerpt: ... LAND TENURE AND LAND LAWS Although the greater portion of the most valuable land within the old settled parts of the Colony has already been alienated and become the property of private individuals, there are still many eligible spots in the coast districts, and large tracts in the Midland and Northern territories, which belong to the Government. These are approximately estimated at 50,000,000 acres. This colonial domain embraces dry pastoral plains, rich forest lands, and well-watered mountain slopes, capable of yielding varied productions. Until lately no effort was made to turn these possessions to account, and they were allowed to lie waste and unoccupied. The exigencies of Government, however, enforced attention to them a few years since, and the result has been the enactment of land laws offering facilities for lease and purchase to all classes of people, which are gradually bringing the whole country under occupation and developing a rich mine of wealth in the expanding rent-roll of the Colony. Before stating what these laws are, we may briefly glance at the systems under which lands were granted in the "good old times." The early settlers, after the first occupation of the Cape by Van Riebeek, had email freeholds given to them along the skirts of Table Mountain; these did not exceed twenty acres, and were burdened with the payment of tithes and other servitudes--to one of which, the planting of trees, the vicinity of Cape Town is still indebted for its 5resent embellishment. In addition to this, tracts of and adjoining those freeholds, or in other parts, were granted under the name of "loan places." The tenure of these was at the will of Government. Auy244 LOAN-PLACES. one desiring a loan farm selected the spot he deemed suitable, planted his mark...
Title:Descriptive Handbook Of The Cape Colony; Its Condition And Resources: Its Condition and ResourcesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:98 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.2 inPublished:February 5, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021782577X

ISBN - 13:9780217825771

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