Diary by Witold GombrowiczDiary by Witold Gombrowicz

Diary

byWitold GombrowiczTranslated byLillian Vallee

Paperback | June 19, 2012

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Just before the outbreak of World War II, young Witold Gombrowicz left his home in Poland and set sail for South America. In 1953, still living as an expatriate in Argentina, he began his Diary with one of literature's most memorable openings:
"Monday
Me.
Tuesday
Me.
Wednesday
Me.
Thursday
Me."

Gombrowicz's Diary grew to become a vast collection of essays, short notes, polemics, and confessions on myriad subjects ranging from political events to literature to the certainty of death. Not a traditional journal, Diary is instead the commentary of a brilliant and restless mind. Widely regarded as a masterpiece, this brilliant work compelled Gombrowicz's attention for a decade and a half until he penned his final entry in France, shortly before his death in 1969.

Long out of print in English, Diary is now presented in a convenient single volume featuring a new preface by Rita Gombrowicz, the author's widow and literary executor. This edition also includes ten previously unpublished pages from the 1969 portion of the diary.

Witold Gombrowicz (1904–1969) was a Polish-born writer of novels, short stories, and plays. His works have been translated into more than thirty languages. Lillian Vallee, an instructor at Modesto Junior College, is an award-winning translator of literature from the Polish. 
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Title:DiaryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:800 pages, 7.75 × 6 × 2 inPublished:June 19, 2012Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300118066

ISBN - 13:9780300118063

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“The spiky brilliance and episodes of vivid experience that share the pages of the Diary with essay-length reflections give the collection as a whole a restive, fugitive rhythm. . . . A provocative experience.”—Eric Banks, Bookforum