Dictionary of Gerontology

Hardcover | July 1, 1988

byDiana K. Harris

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Because of the different disciplines that gerontology encompasses, the definition it uses can prove bewildering to students, scholars, and practitioners. Diana Harris is the first scholar to deal with this terminology in a comprehensive manner. Reflecting multidisciplinary perspectives and introducing standardization, her dictionary offers hundreds of precisely defined terms and concepts, as well as detailed, up-to-date bibliographic information. Because of the different disciplines that gerontology encompasses, the definitions it uses can prove bewildering to students, scholars, and practitioners. Diana Harris is the first scholar to deal with this terminology in a comprehensive manner. Reflecting multidisciplinary perspectives and introducing standardization, her dictionary offers hundreds of precisely defined terms and concepts, as well as detailed, up-to-date bibliographic information.

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Because of the different disciplines that gerontology encompasses, the definition it uses can prove bewildering to students, scholars, and practitioners. Diana Harris is the first scholar to deal with this terminology in a comprehensive manner. Reflecting multidisciplinary perspectives and introducing standardization, her dictionary of...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:216 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:July 1, 1988Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313252874

ISBN - 13:9780313252877

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?This dictionary in the new and growing field of gerontology serves a twofold purpose: to further the development of a specialized gerontological terminology; and because of the multidisciplinary nature of gerontology, to assist students, scholars, researchers, and practitioners in the field in understanding the terminology that is used in the various disciplines that gerontology encompasses.' Entries are in alphabetical order. The definitions range from one to five sentences and are clear, concise, and as jargon-free as possible. As in other Greenwood publications, internal cross-references are noted by asterisks, and see also references are given for related terms. The cross-references are well done. The Dictionary includes well-known terms; common terms applied to the field of aging; vocabulary related to medicine and research methods; and specialized theories, studies, terms, and organizations in the field. Several diagrams and graphs give additional information, and the book concludes with an index to personal names. The Dictionary of Gerontology is a good and useful effort that will be helpful in academic and public libraries.?-Reference Books Bulletin