Dilemmas in the Study of Information: Exploring the Boundaries of Information Science by S. D. NeillDilemmas in the Study of Information: Exploring the Boundaries of Information Science by S. D. Neill

Dilemmas in the Study of Information: Exploring the Boundaries of Information Science

byS. D. Neill

Hardcover | January 1, 1992

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This thought-provoking book identifies the limits of the field of information science, and thus raises very real problems of the discipline in the context of people using, misusing, and abusing information. S. D. Neill provides many examples of the uses of information to illustrate how difficult it is to work with. In particular, he highlights problems of information scientists using information to study information. It is the author's contention that information use problems are, in certain instances, insoluble dilemmas, for they are grounded in human nature and can be solved only by altering that nature. Neill analyzes certain events to show that while sufficient information was available, it wasn't used--either because of greed, personality, or judgement. Information is power if, and only if, you have enough knowledge to understand it, the will to use it, and the ability to communicate it. The dilemmas are found in the control of information for retrieval, the use of data originally collected for other purposes, and research methods in library and information science.
Title:Dilemmas in the Study of Information: Exploring the Boundaries of Information ScienceFormat:HardcoverDimensions:200 pages, 9.52 × 6.08 × 0.7 inPublished:January 1, 1992Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313277346

ISBN - 13:9780313277344

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Editorial Reviews

?Dilemmas in the Study of Information: Exploring the Boundaries of Information Science is by no means quite as simple. It is a complex, and too often complicated, examination of a wide range of the information problems that we as imperfect, reasoning--but not rational--human beings face as we attempt to use, and too often misuse, information. It is an examination that is made more complex by a discussion that concentrates on considering the work of some of the more difficult to understand philosophers and librarians, such as Popper and Dervin, respectively, in an idiosyncratic approach that ranges widely over such dilemmas as human imperfection, information ignored, the quality of information, information overload, and unknown information. Don't be put off by the complexity of Neill's arguments or the apparent difficulty of following his train of thought, which sometimes wanders into fascinating byways. What is hidden here are important elements of the same basic issues that Stieg raises. One needs to stay with it and take this book in small doses. Luckily, the complexity of Neill's arguments is made much more acceptable by the grace and wit with which he writes. He places his own work into a delightful perspective when he concludes, 'Today the sun is warm, and I intend to take my lunch to the high bank of the river, sit by the tumbling waters, and absorb the odors of spring.' We should all do the same from time to time.??Library Journal