Discovering the History of Psychiatry

Hardcover | February 1, 1994

EditorMark S. Micale, Roy Porter

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Psychiatry and psychology, including psychoanalysis, have exercised enormous cultural and scientific influence in our century, and an important part of the growth of these fields has been their attempt to construct accounts of their own disciplinary pasts. Yet these accounts, which form thecollective memory of the psychiatric profession, have varied greatly. In fact, the history of psychiatry has emerged as one of the most rapidly-growing and controversy-ridden areas of commentary in recent years. This book brings together twenty studies by a cast of eminent authors--physicians,social scientists, and humanists from Europe and North America--who explore the many complex interpretive and ideological dimensions of history writing about the psychological sciences. It includes chapters on the history of the asylum, Freud biography, anti-psychiatry in the United States andabroad, feminist interpretations of psychiatry's past, and historical accounts of Nazism and psychotherapy, as well as discussions of many individual historical figures and movements. This book represents the first attempt to study comprehensively the multiple mythologies that have grown up aroundthe history of madness and the origin, functions, and validity of these myths in our psychological century.

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From Our Editors

The field of psychiatry has exercised enormous influence in our century, not only among scientists and mental health professionals, but also in the arts, humanities, and social sciences which shape the cultural life of millions. This vitality has been accompanied by a profusion of historical material. Yet, while growing rapidly, the do...

From the Publisher

Psychiatry and psychology, including psychoanalysis, have exercised enormous cultural and scientific influence in our century, and an important part of the growth of these fields has been their attempt to construct accounts of their own disciplinary pasts. Yet these accounts, which form thecollective memory of the psychiatric professio...

From the Jacket

The field of psychiatry has exercised enormous influence in our century, not only among scientists and mental health professionals, but also in the arts, humanities, and social sciences which shape the cultural life of millions. This vitality has been accompanied by a profusion of historical material. Yet, while growing rapidly, the do...

Mark S. Micale is at Yale University. Roy Porter is at Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, London.

other books by Mark S. Micale

Format:HardcoverDimensions:480 pages, 9.57 × 6.3 × 1.42 inPublished:February 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195077393

ISBN - 13:9780195077391

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Table of Contents

1. R. Porter and M.S. Micale: Introduction: Reflections on Psychiatry and Its HistoriesI. Early Developments2. O. Marx: On the Origins of Psychiatric Historiography in Nineteenth-Century Germany3. G. Mora: Early American Historians of Psychiatry, 1910-1960II. Five Major Voices4. R. Porter: Ida Macalpine and Richard Hunter: History Between Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry5. E.T. Morman: George Rosen and the History of Mental Illness6. M.S. Micale: Henri F. Ellenberger: The History of Psychiatry as the History of the Unconscious7. F. Vidal: Jean Starobinski: The History of Psychiatry as the Cultural History of ConsciousnessIII. The Psychoanalytic Strain8. E. Young-Bruehl: A History of Freud Biography9. J. Forrester: "A Whole Climate of Opinion": Writing and Rewriting the History of Psychoanalysis10. K. Piver: Philip Rieff: The Critic of Psychoanalysis as Cultural TheoristIV. Historical Themes and Topics11. P. Vandermeersch: Les Mythes D'Origines in the History of Psychiatry12. D. Weiner: "Le Geste de Pinel": The History of a Psychiatric Myth13. P. Guarnieri: The History and Historiography of Psychiatry in Italy14. G. Grob: The History of the Asylum Revisited: Personal Reflections15. G. Cocks: German Psychiatrists, Psychoanalysts, and Psychotherapists During the Nazi Period: A Historiographical Survey16. J. Brown: Heroes and Non-Heroes: Recurring Themes in the History of Soviet Russian PsychiatryV. Critics of Psychiatry17. R. Vatz and L. Weinberg: The Rhetorical Paradigm in Psychiatric History: Thomas Szasz, Psychiatric History, and the Myth of Mental Illness18. G. Gutting: Michel Foucalt's Phanomologie des Krankengeistes19. N. Tomes: Feminist Histories of Psychiatry20. J. Postel and D. Allen: History and Anti-Psychiatry in France21. N. Dain: Psychiatry and Anti-Psychiatry in the United States

From Our Editors

The field of psychiatry has exercised enormous influence in our century, not only among scientists and mental health professionals, but also in the arts, humanities, and social sciences which shape the cultural life of millions. This vitality has been accompanied by a profusion of historical material. Yet, while growing rapidly, the documented history of psychiatry has been ridden with controversy due to the great variety of interpretive nuance among different writers. This book brings together leading international authorities - physicians, historians, social scientists, and others - who explore the many complex interpretive and ideological dimensions of historical writing about psychiatry. The book includes chapters on the history of the asylum, Freud, anti-psychiatry in the United States and abroad, feminist interpretations of psychiatry's past, and historical accounts of Nazism and psychotherapy, as well as discussions of many individual historical figures and movements. It represents the first attempt to study comprehensively the multiple mythologies that hav

Editorial Reviews

"Now professional historians are studying the history of psychiatry and writing about its histories. The book shows that we can learn much from their labors."--American Journal of Psychiatry