Displaced: The Human Cost of Development and Resettlement

Paperback | March 15, 2012

byOlivia Bennett, Christopher Mcdowell

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Although displacement is often associated with conflict zones, millions of people are resettled yearly in the name of development and progress. They endure social and cultural disruption as well as economic upheaval, and their voices are rarely heard. This groundbreaking volume collects oral histories that reveal the challenges they face, such as the loss of cultural identity, shifting social roles, and fractured family relationships. Though full of regret and loss, these accounts reveal incredible resourcefulness and resilience in the face of profound change. Together, they form a crucial reminder of development's often devastating human cost.

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Although displacement is often associated with conflict zones, millions of people are resettled yearly in the name of development and progress. They endure social and cultural disruption as well as economic upheaval, and their voices are rarely heard. This groundbreaking volume collects oral histories that reveal the challenges they fa...

Olivia Bennett has been a writer, editor, and researcher in development information and publishing for more than 35 years. She developed the oral testimony program of activities at Panos London, where she co-authored Arms to Fight; Arms to Protect: Women Speak Out about Conflict. Christopher McDowell is a reader in International Polit...
Format:PaperbackDimensions:250 pages, 9.67 × 5.98 × 0.5 inPublished:March 15, 2012Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230117864

ISBN - 13:9780230117860

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Table of Contents

Moving People: States, Displacement, and Resettlement
The Individual Voice: The Challenges and Benefits of Listening to Personal Narratives
'We had a set way of life. All that has been disturbed': Tarbela Dam, Pakistan
'I have lost status in my community': Conservation and Agricultural Production in Kenya
'The people's place became the animals' place': Resettlement Policies and Conservation in Botswana and Namibia
'Our fields have gone, our lifestyle has changed': Coal Mining in India
'The wisdom of living in this place will be lost': Mohale Dam, Lesotho, before Resettlement
'I do not have the cleverness for here': Mohale Dam, Lesotho, after Displacement
Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

'This is a very timely and extremely important book which puts local people first in addressing the costs of international development across two continents: Africa and Asia. The immediacy of displacement and the resettlement experience is the framework with which the authors and those interviewed reveal the tragedy of dispossession as well as the spirit of resilience and recovery. For several decades policy makers, practitioners, and academics alike have called for a refocus on 'people' in development. This book does just that by giving voice to those affected by development-induced displacement. I predict that this will become a major work in the field of development studies.'—Dawn Chatty, professor in Anthropology and Forced Migration, Refugee Studies Centre, Department of International Development, University of Oxford'This is an exciting, outstanding, and welcome addition to the literature on displacement and forced migration as a result of development and resettlement. The depth and breadth of personal narrative covered here provides an emphasis on the actual voices of the displaced, as well as the diverse experiences of those affected by large projects, thereby increasing the sense of their agency.'—Pablo Bose, assistant professor, Department of Geography, University of Vermont'No matter where the rivers are dammed or the mines dug, the outcome of such initiatives in all cases is invariably the impoverishment of project area people. This volume, based on interviews with the affected people conducted in half a dozen countries in Asia and Africa, gives them a unique opportunity to tell the world in their own words what it means to be displaced, and abandoned to face the challenges of rebuilding the lives without any semblance of resettlement assistance. For policymakers, in particular, this book should be a compulsory reading, because policies made so far without taking the ground realities into account have often turned out to be nothing but an exercise in futility. An important contribution to the discussion on methodological issues in resettlement research.'—Hari Mohan Mathur, visiting professor, Council for Social Development, New Delhi'This powerful book conveys through vivid oral testimony the direct human cost of displacement, whether to make way for state dams or for commercial mining, forcing out people from their homes and land, scattering their kin, and shattering their economies and cultures.'—Paul Thompson, emeritus professor in Sociology, University of Essex'This is a timely and eloquent wake-up call from the voices of the unseen and unheard casualties displaced by development. With vivid realism, these voices bring alive the terrible trauma and human costs so prevalent with displacement and forced resettlement. Let us hope that the lessons in this book provoke and inspire more humane and just approaches with the increasing millions who will be displaced in coming years.'—Robert Chambers, research associate, Institute of Development Studies, Sussex