Dispossession and the Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New Guinea by Paige WestDispossession and the Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New Guinea by Paige West

Dispossession and the Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New Guinea

byPaige West

Paperback | October 11, 2016

Pricing and Purchase Info

$36.87 online 
$39.00 list price save 5%
Earn 184 plum® points
Quantity:

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

When journalists, developers, surf tourists, and conservation NGOs cast Papua New Guineans as living in a prior nature and prior culture, they devalue their knowledge and practice, facilitating their dispossession. Paige West's searing study reveals how a range of actors produce and reinforce inequalities in today's globalized world. She shows how racist rhetorics of representation underlie all uneven patterns of development and seeks a more robust understanding of the ideological work that capital requires for constant regeneration.

Paige West is professor of anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University.
Loading
Title:Dispossession and the Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New GuineaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:216 pagesPublished:October 11, 2016Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231178794

ISBN - 13:9780231178792

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsMap of the Island of New GuineaIntroduction1. "Such a Site for Play, This Edge": Tourism and Modernist Fantasy2. "We Are Here to Build Your Capacity": Development as a Vehicle for Accumulation and Dispossession3. Discovering the Already Known: Tree Kangaroos, Explorer Imaginings, and Indigenous Articulations4. Indigenous Theories of Accumulation, Dispossession, Possession, and SovereigntyAfterword. Birdsongs: In Memory of Neil Smith (1954-2012)NotesBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

Drawing from the author's two decades of research experience in Papua New Guinea, this engaging, lively, and lucid manuscript discusses how structural inequalities are produced, lived, and reinforced in today's globalized world.