Dissent in Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement in the Midwest, 1954-72

Paperback | September 24, 2007

byGretchen Cassel Eick

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On a hot summer evening in 1958, a group of African American students in Wichita, Kansas, quietly entered Dockum's Drug Store and sat down at the whites-only lunch counter. This was the beginning of the first sustained, successful student sit-in of the modern civil rights movement, instigated in violation of the national NAACP's instructions. Based on interviews with over eighty participants and observers of this sit-in, Dissent in Wichita traces the contours of race relations and black activism in an unexpected locus of the civil rights movement, revealing that the movement was a national, not a southern, phenomenon.

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On a hot summer evening in 1958, a group of African American students in Wichita, Kansas, quietly entered Dockum's Drug Store and sat down at the whites-only lunch counter. This was the beginning of the first sustained, successful student sit-in of the modern civil rights movement, instigated in violation of the national NAACP's instru...

Gretchen Cassel Eick, a professor of history at Friends University, Wichita, has received two Fulbright grants and was for ten years a professional lobbyist in Washington, D.C.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:344 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:September 24, 2007Publisher:University of Illinois PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0252074912

ISBN - 13:9780252074912

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“What makes Dissent in Wichita more than a local case study is its detailed analysis of the NAACP. . . . Eick’s rendering of the internal power struggle that pitched the ‘young Turks’ of the NAACP against the old guard makes fascinating if depressing reading.”--Journal of American History