Dissenters and Mavericks: Writings About India in English, 1765-2000

Hardcover | September 15, 2002

byMargery Sabin

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Dissenters and Mavericks reinvigorates the interdisciplinary study of literature, history, and politics through an approach to reading that allows the voices heard in writing a chance to talk back, to exert pressure on the presuppositions and preferences of a wide range of readers. Offeringfresh and provocative interpretations of both well-known and unfamiliar texts--from colonial writers such as Horace Walpole and Edmund Burke to twentieth-century Indian writers such as Nirad Chaudhuri, V.S. Naipaul, and Pankaj Mishra--the book proposes a controversial challenge to prevailingacademic methodology in the field of postcolonial studies.

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Dissenters and Mavericks reinvigorates the interdisciplinary study of literature, history, and politics through an approach to reading that allows the voices heard in writing a chance to talk back, to exert pressure on the presuppositions and preferences of a wide range of readers. Offeringfresh and provocative interpretations of both ...

Margery Sabin is at Wellesley College.

other books by Margery Sabin

Format:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 5.98 × 9.21 × 0.91 inPublished:September 15, 2002Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195150171

ISBN - 13:9780195150179

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"Tough-minded and written with exemplary clarity, Dissenters and Mavericks will stir controversy and in fact invites it, for it is in itself an act of dissent from the current orthodoxies of postcolonial studies. Margery Sabin's work marks a new stage in our attempts to deal with the historyof writing about India in English--and new precisely because it might, to some readers, seem old-fashioned in its concern with questions of individuation and idiosyncrasy."--Michael Gorra, Smith College