Does Foreign Aid Really Work?

Paperback | September 15, 2008

byRoger C. Riddell

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Foreign aid is now a $100bn business and is expanding more rapidly today than it has for a generation. But does it work? Indeed, is it needed at all? Other attempts to answer these important questions have been dominated by a focus on the impact of official aid provided by governments. But today possibly as much as 30 percent of aid is provided by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), and over 10 percent is provided as emergency assistance. In this first-ever attempt to provide an overall assessment of aid, Roger Riddell presents a rigorous but highly readable account of aid, warts and all. Does Foreign Aid Really Work? sets out the evidence and exposes the instances where aid has failed and explains why. The book also examines the waythat politics distorts aid, and disentangles the moral and ethical assumptions that lie behind the belief that aid does good. The book concludes by detailing the practical ways that aid needs to change if it is to be the effective force for good that its providers claim it is.

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Foreign aid is now a $100bn business and is expanding more rapidly today than it has for a generation. But does it work? Indeed, is it needed at all? Other attempts to answer these important questions have been dominated by a focus on the impact of official aid provided by governments. But today possibly as much as 30 percent of aid is...

Roger Riddell is a Non-Executive Director of Oxford Policy Management and a Principle of The Policy Practice. He was Chair of the first Presidential Economic Commission of Independent Zimbabwe in 1980, and Chief Economist of the Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries from 1981-83. From 1984 to 1998, he was a senior Research Fellow at th...

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Hardcover|Apr 30 1999

$270.27 online$352.50list price(save 23%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:536 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.06 inPublished:September 15, 2008Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199544468

ISBN - 13:9780199544462

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Table of Contents

1. 'A Good Thing?'Part I: The Complex Worlds of Foreign Aid2. The origins and early decades of aid-giving3. Aid-giving from the 1970s to the present4. The growing web of bilateral aid donors5. The complexities of multilateral aidPart II: Why is Aid Given?6. The political and commercial dimensions of aid7. Public support for aid8. Charity or duty? The moral case for aid9. The moral case for governments and individuals to provide aidPart III: Does Aid Really Work?10. Assessing and measuring the impact of aid11. The impact of official development aid projects12. The impact of programme aid, technical assistance and aid for capacity development13. The impact of aid at the country and cross-country level14. Assesing the impact of aid conditionality15. Does official development aid really work? A summing up16. NGOs in development and the impact of discrete NGO development interventions17. The wider impact of non-governmental and civil society organizations18. The growth of emergencies and the humanitarian response19. The impact of emergency and humanitarian aidPart IV: Towards a Different Future for Aid20. Why aid isn't working21. Making aid work better by implementing agreed reforms22. Making aid work better by recasting aid relationships

Editorial Reviews

`'In this impressive new study, Riddell has surpassed even his distinguished Foreign Aid Reconsidered. It includes a rare and much-needed analysis of emergency and voluntary assistance. Complete and authoritative, the book will have a long life as the definitive account of its importantsubject.''Professor Robert Cassen, London School of Economics