Dolley Madison: The Problem of National Unity by Catherine AllgorDolley Madison: The Problem of National Unity by Catherine Allgor

Dolley Madison: The Problem of National Unity

byCatherine Allgor

Paperback | September 25, 2012

Pricing and Purchase Info

$33.37 online 
$58.70 list price save 43%
Earn 167 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

First Lady of the United States and America's "Queen of Hearts," Dolley Madison fashioned an unofficial role for herself in the new administration of the United States, helping to answer the nation's need for ceremony and leaving footprints for centuries of presidential wives to follow. Assisting her husband, James Madison, she helped to promote national unity, modeling a political behavior that stressed civility and empathy. Together, their approach fueled bipartisanship in a country still assembling a political identity.About the Lives of American Women series:Selected and edited by renowned women's historian Carol Berkin, these brief biographies are designed for use in undergraduate courses. Rather than a comprehensive approach, each biography focuses instead on a particular aspect of a women's life that is emblematic of her time, or which made her a pivotal figure in the era. The emphasis is on a "good read," featuring accessible writing and compelling narratives, without sacrificing sound scholarship and academic integrity. Primary sources at the end of each biography reveal the subject's perspective in her own words. Study questions and an annotated bibliography support the student reader.
Catherine Allgoris professor of history at UC Riverside where she holds the prestigious UC Presidential Chair. She earned her PhD from Yale in 1998, where she also won the Yale Teaching Award. Her dissertation won prizes, including the best dissertation in U.S. Women's history in the country. Her bookParlor Politics: In Which the Ladie...
Loading
Title:Dolley Madison: The Problem of National UnityFormat:PaperbackDimensions:194 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:September 25, 2012Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0813347599

ISBN - 13:9780813347592

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction

1 A Triumphal Finish
The Madisons Leave Washington

2 A Perfect Match
Dolley and James Madison

3 “More Agreeable Hours”
The Secretary of State Years

4 The Merry Affair
Diplomatic Disunity

5 “A Perfect Palace”
Dolley Creates the White House

6 “A Place to See and Be Seen”
The Uses of the Drawing Room

7 The “Queen of Hearts”
Dolley’s Public Persona

8 “Mrs. Madison’s War”
Dolley’s Role in the War of 1812

9 Washington Divided
Dolley’s Work for Unity Under Fire

10 “A More Perfect Union”
The Madison Legacy

Primary Sources
Making Your Own History

STUDY QUESTIONS
NOTES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX

Editorial Reviews

“Allgor digs deep beneath the surface of the ‘Magnificent Doll,' revealing the far-reaching impact Dolley Madison had upon the political landscape of the early nineteenth century and the collective psyche of the American public for generations to come.”—BooklistPraise for Lives of American Women“Finally! The majority of students—by which I mean women—will have the opportunity to read biographies of women from our nation's past. (Men can read them too, of course!) The ‘Lives of American Women' series features an eclectic collection of books, readily accessible to students who will be able to see the contributions of women in many fields over the course of our history. Long overdue, these books will be a valuable resource for teachers, students, and the public at large.”—Cokie Roberts, author of Founding Mothers and Ladies of Liberty“Just what any professor wants: books that will intrigue, inform, and fascinate students! These short, readable biographies of American women—specifically designed for classroom use—give instructors an appealing new option to assign to their history students.”—Mary Beth Norton, Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History, Cornell University