Domestic Biography: The Legacy of Evangelicalism in Four Nineteenth-Century Families by Christopher Tolley

Domestic Biography: The Legacy of Evangelicalism in Four Nineteenth-Century Families

byChristopher Tolley

Hardcover | February 1, 1997

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Christopher Tolley has written a fascinating account of the influence of evangelicalism upon eminent Victorians, from the members of the Clapham sect down to the more secular Bloomsbury group. Recording family life (and deaths) was an important ritual in Victorian households, and out of thishabit grew a new literary genre, the domestic biography, celebrating individual achievement, family piety, and domestic virtue. Using a wide range of hitherto unpublished material from family archives, Dr Tolley analyses the biographical traditions exemplified by the public and private utterances ofdifferent generations of four leading Victorian families: Macaulay, Stephen, Wilberforce, and Thornton. This book is a perceptive commentary on the role of the domestic biography as a testament to the cultural legacy of the Victorian intelligentsia, and the creation of `family values'.

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Christopher Tolley is at Winchester College.
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Title:Domestic Biography: The Legacy of Evangelicalism in Four Nineteenth-Century FamiliesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:300 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.91 inPublished:February 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198206518

ISBN - 13:9780198206514

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`the book is well written and, through apt quotation, gives a vivid sense of the tone and atmosphere of life in such evangelical families, in which sermons and jokes could readily coexist ... Tolley is sensitive to nuances of language and to changing perceptions of the relationship betweenprivate and public.'Jane Garnett, Wadham College, Oxford, EHR June 99