Dracula

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Dracula

by BRAM STOKER

Dutton | June 10, 2011 | Hardcover

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Of the many admiring reviews Bram Stoker's Dracula received when it first appeared in 1897, the most astute praise came from the author's mother, who wrote her son: "It is splendid. No book since Mrs. Shelley's Frankenstein or indeed any other at all has come near yours in originality, or terror."

A popular bestseller in Victorian England, Stoker's hypnotic tale of the bloodthirsty Count Dracula, whose nocturnal atrocities are symbolic of an evil ages old yet forever new, endures as the quintessential story of suspense and horror. The unbridled lusts and desires, the diabolical cravings that Stoker dramatized with such mythical force, render Dracula resonant and unsettling a century later.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 384 pages, 9.38 × 5.84 × 1.37 in

Published: June 10, 2011

Publisher: Dutton

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0525951628

ISBN - 13: 9780525951629

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– More About This Product –

Dracula

Dracula

by BRAM STOKER

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 384 pages, 9.38 × 5.84 × 1.37 in

Published: June 10, 2011

Publisher: Dutton

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0525951628

ISBN - 13: 9780525951629

About the Book

Since its publication in 1897, "Dracula" has continued to terrify readers with its depiction of a vampire possessing an insatiable thirst for blood, and the group of hunters determined to end his existence before he destroys a young womans soul. Features a new Introduction. Revised reissue.

Read from the Book

Chapter IJonathan Harker’s Journal(Kept in shorthand.)3 May. Bistritz.1–Left Munich at 8:35 p. m., on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6:46, but train was an hour late. Buda-Pesth seems a wonderful place, from the glimpse which I got of it from the train and the little I could walk through the streets. I feared to go very far from the station, as we arrived late and would start as near the correct time as possible. The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; the most western of splendid bridges over the Danube,2 which is here of noble width and depth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule.We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh.3 Here I stopped for the night at the Hotel Royale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done up some way with red pepper, which was very good but thirsty. (Mem., get recipe for Mina.) I asked the waiter, and he said it was called “paprika hendl,” and that, as it was a national dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians.4 I found my smattering of German very useful here; indeed, I don’t know how I should be able to get on without it.Having had some time at my disposal when in London, I had visited the British Museum,5 and made search among the books and maps in the library regarding Transylvania: it had struck me that some foreknowledge of the country could hardly fail to have some importance in dealing with a noble
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From the Publisher

Of the many admiring reviews Bram Stoker's Dracula received when it first appeared in 1897, the most astute praise came from the author's mother, who wrote her son: "It is splendid. No book since Mrs. Shelley's Frankenstein or indeed any other at all has come near yours in originality, or terror."

A popular bestseller in Victorian England, Stoker's hypnotic tale of the bloodthirsty Count Dracula, whose nocturnal atrocities are symbolic of an evil ages old yet forever new, endures as the quintessential story of suspense and horror. The unbridled lusts and desires, the diabolical cravings that Stoker dramatized with such mythical force, render Dracula resonant and unsettling a century later.

About the Author

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) was born in Ireland and attended Trinity College in Dublin. He joined the Irish Civil Service, then became involved in the theater. He wrote seventeen books.

Editorial Reviews

"Those who cannot find their own reflection in Bram Stoker's still-living creation are surely the undead."