Dubliners by James Joyce

Dubliners

byJames Joyce

Kobo ebook | November 27, 2011

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pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. THERE was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke. Night after night I had passed the house (it was vacation time) and studied the lighted square of window: and night after night I had found it lighted in the same way, faintly and evenly. If he was dead, I thought, I would see the reflection of candles on the darkened blind for I knew that two candles must be set at the head of a corpse. He had often said to me: I am not long for this world, and I had thought his words idle. Now I knew they were true. Every night as I gazed up at the window I said softly to myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work.
Title:DublinersFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:November 27, 2011Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:2819915337

ISBN - 13:9782819915331

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dubliners by James Joyce There are two types of stories in Dubliners. The first, and by far the most effective, are those associated with despair, nihilism and death. The second type deals with more ordinary aspects of modern life, the representation of the city and social exchanges. As a collection they provide an image of dark, murky city struggling to cope with the problems associated with rapid urbanisation. The stories do not intertwine, but you are left with the impression that they are not that far from each other: their proximity feels close as you read further into each one.Calmly engaged within the secure air of its daily affairs, the people of Dublin were also ostensibly calm and secure and yet a moment reflection about a dormant or potential life managed to extract stories which were snuggled in simple form and simpler titles but traced intricate and at times, unheeded emotions. An aimless walk concluded in cheap happiness and an embarrassing accident convinced someone to search for an elusive redemption. A death unveiled the value of oblivious living while a motherly conduct was driven by frustrations and misplaced ambitions. Most of these characters were representative, not whole but of a remarkable fragment of lives that we either experience ourselves or witness in others during the time we live. The true mastery of Joyce’s writing reveals itself in what he doesn’t say, the subtle suggestions, the lingering questions, as each story closes without any sense of full resolution. And, again, is this not true of real life? In narrative tradition there is a structured beginning, middle and end, but in the reality of existence it doesn’t quite work this way. Life carries on. It doesn’t have a form of narrative closure, a convenient wrapping up of plot, after each wound we take in life. It carries on. We carry on. And for the Dubliners isolation carries on.
Date published: 2018-04-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dubliners by James Joyce There are two types of stories in Dubliners. The first, and by far the most effective, are those associated with despair, nihilism and death. The second type deals with more ordinary aspects of modern life, the representation of the city and social exchanges. As a collection they provide an image of dark, murky city struggling to cope with the problems associated with rapid urbanisation. The stories do not intertwine, but you are left with the impression that they are not that far from each other: their proximity feels close as you read further into each one.Calmly engaged within the secure air of its daily affairs, the people of Dublin were also ostensibly calm and secure and yet a moment reflection about a dormant or potential life managed to extract stories which were snuggled in simple form and simpler titles but traced intricate and at times, unheeded emotions. An aimless walk concluded in cheap happiness and an embarrassing accident convinced someone to search for an elusive redemption. A death unveiled the value of oblivious living while a motherly conduct was driven by frustrations and misplaced ambitions. Most of these characters were representative, not whole but of a remarkable fragment of lives that we either experience ourselves or witness in others during the time we live. The true mastery of Joyce’s writing reveals itself in what he doesn’t say, the subtle suggestions, the lingering questions, as each story closes without any sense of full resolution. And, again, is this not true of real life? In narrative tradition there is a structured beginning, middle and end, but in the reality of existence it doesn’t quite work this way. Life carries on. It doesn’t have a form of narrative closure, a convenient wrapping up of plot, after each wound we take in life. It carries on. We carry on. And for the Dubliners isolation carries on.
Date published: 2018-04-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dubliners by James Joyce There are two types of stories in Dubliners. The first, and by far the most effective, are those associated with despair, nihilism and death. The second type deals with more ordinary aspects of modern life, the representation of the city and social exchanges. As a collection they provide an image of dark, murky city struggling to cope with the problems associated with rapid urbanisation. The stories do not intertwine, but you are left with the impression that they are not that far from each other: their proximity feels close as you read further into each one.Calmly engaged within the secure air of its daily affairs, the people of Dublin were also ostensibly calm and secure and yet a moment reflection about a dormant or potential life managed to extract stories which were snuggled in simple form and simpler titles but traced intricate and at times, unheeded emotions. An aimless walk concluded in cheap happiness and an embarrassing accident convinced someone to search for an elusive redemption. A death unveiled the value of oblivious living while a motherly conduct was driven by frustrations and misplaced ambitions. Most of these characters were representative, not whole but of a remarkable fragment of lives that we either experience ourselves or witness in others during the time we live. The true mastery of Joyce’s writing reveals itself in what he doesn’t say, the subtle suggestions, the lingering questions, as each story closes without any sense of full resolution. And, again, is this not true of real life? In narrative tradition there is a structured beginning, middle and end, but in the reality of existence it doesn’t quite work this way. Life carries on. It doesn’t have a form of narrative closure, a convenient wrapping up of plot, after each wound we take in life. It carries on. We carry on. And for the Dubliners isolation carries on.
Date published: 2018-04-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dubliners by James Joyce There are two types of stories in Dubliners. The first, and by far the most effective, are those associated with despair, nihilism and death. The second type deals with more ordinary aspects of modern life, the representation of the city and social exchanges. As a collection they provide an image of dark, murky city struggling to cope with the problems associated with rapid urbanisation. The stories do not intertwine, but you are left with the impression that they are not that far from each other: their proximity feels close as you read further into each one.Calmly engaged within the secure air of its daily affairs, the people of Dublin were also ostensibly calm and secure and yet a moment reflection about a dormant or potential life managed to extract stories which were snuggled in simple form and simpler titles but traced intricate and at times, unheeded emotions. An aimless walk concluded in cheap happiness and an embarrassing accident convinced someone to search for an elusive redemption. A death unveiled the value of oblivious living while a motherly conduct was driven by frustrations and misplaced ambitions. Most of these characters were representative, not whole but of a remarkable fragment of lives that we either experience ourselves or witness in others during the time we live. The true mastery of Joyce’s writing reveals itself in what he doesn’t say, the subtle suggestions, the lingering questions, as each story closes without any sense of full resolution. And, again, is this not true of real life? In narrative tradition there is a structured beginning, middle and end, but in the reality of existence it doesn’t quite work this way. Life carries on. It doesn’t have a form of narrative closure, a convenient wrapping up of plot, after each wound we take in life. It carries on. We carry on. And for the Dubliners isolation carries on.
Date published: 2018-04-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great great book - really enjoyed it
Date published: 2018-01-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Joyce James Joyce gives us an extraordinary collection of short stories that you wont regret to have it. I love this edition. Great book!
Date published: 2017-08-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great collection one of the best books of short stories ever written
Date published: 2017-07-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great slice of Ireland I especially liked the last short story in the book, “The Dead.” However, given that so many people around the world are from Ireland, I think it is important to understand the society from which they fled.
Date published: 2017-03-26
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great stories! Very great collection of stories!
Date published: 2017-01-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A favorite So steeped in imagery and subtext there is something new to discover with each reading of this collection.
Date published: 2016-11-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from interesting Irish literature at its best. This complex series of intelocking yet independent stoyies gives the reader a complete view of irish life durring that period. My favoret has to be the dead where biblical imagery and the decline of irish tradition cause Michael to leave his self centered view of his life.
Date published: 2008-01-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great stories by a great writer Dubliners is a collection of short stories by one of the finest writers in the twentieth-century, James Joyce. The stories in the collection have a natural progression, where they start from being about a characters childhood to adolescence to adulthood. The stories also have a sense of their characters in them. Araby, one of the stories about a characters childhood, is written from the point-of-view of the character and gives the stories a sense of authenticity, which is captured through the rest of the stories as well, even if they are not in first-person. My two favorite stories in the collection though are Eveline and The Dead, which must be considered one of the most profound short stories ever written. Eveline is basically the story of a girl trying to make a decision between the life she knows and the man she loves. It’s such a beautifully written story and I felt that I could actually get a sense of the feelings that she was feeling and the thoughts and decisions she was throwing around in her head. However, as many would agree, it’s The Dead that makes this collection stand out above many other anthologies of short stories. The gripping nature of the story and the emotions conveyed by the characters are so moving and so realistic that you can’t help but fall for the characters and want everything to work out. It is a perfect way to wrap up such a perfect compilation of works.
Date published: 2005-12-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Two Thumbs Up James Joyce’s Dubliners are tales that depict how life is/was for Ireland. His stories are filled with a variety of characters who add colour to each one of the stories. For example, in the boarding house, Mrs. Mooney as a strict madam adds a semi villain to the story. I thought that the book Dubliners was hard to put down. This is because James Joyce captures his reader with starting the story not in the beginning but right in the middle. This makes the reader unsure of whom the characters are. Therefore, the reader must continue reading in order to figure this out. As well as hooking the reader, Joyce also shows a range of emotions in his story. In Araby it is a little boy who must deal with disappointment, in both Eveline and The Boarding house are emotions of Love and Loss. It is because these emotions are present in daily life that the reader finds it easier to relate to the characters and care about them. Each story brings a unique veiw point on the emotions that we are faced with in daily life. In conclution, I found Dubliners to be interesting and informative. I found that it was a window into the daily life of the people of Dublin.
Date published: 2005-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from See our own lives through his extrodinary talent No one as yet like James Joyce, whose linguistic talent has such an extrodinary effect on how I redefine life. It is not just about the Dubliners, but rather, each and everyone of us. The book itself examined the deepest part of our emotions and desires, and thus awakes us from the long sleep we all have been put into by the hands of routine. We have been chained up by it for so long, living in the paralysis without even realizing it ourselves. And this is the book that hints us. Reading this book is not far from holding up a piece of mirror and see the reflections of ourselves through it.
Date published: 2001-05-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exhilerating! I began reading this book of short stories as part of my CEGEP program. I was immediately hooked after reading "Eveline". These are some of the most beautiful and touching stories that I have ever read! This book has turned me on to short stories and has opened my eyes to the wonders of books!
Date published: 1999-09-17