Early Astronomy by Hugh ThurstonEarly Astronomy by Hugh Thurston

Early Astronomy

byHugh Thurston

Paperback | August 29, 1996

Pricing and Purchase Info

$125.55 online 
$141.95 list price save 11%
Earn 628 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky: they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts-ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge-that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by the medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the earth from the central stationary position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations.
Title:Early AstronomyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:278 pages, 9.25 × 6.1 × 0.03 inPublished:August 29, 1996Publisher:Springer New York

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0387948228

ISBN - 13:9780387948225

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

From Our Editors

The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky; they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts - ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge - that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India, and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the Earth from the stationary central position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations. This book covers the history of astronomy from its earliest beginnings to this point, which marks the beginning of modern instrumental and mathematical astronomy. The work of earlier astro