Economic Evaluation in Child Health

Paperback | November 8, 2009

EditorWendy Ungar

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Guidelines for conducting health economic evaluations have become increasingly standardized, however they don't address the unique concerns of the paediatric population. The challenges of measuring costs and consequences in children, from neonate to late adolescence, are numerous and complex.With the growing acceptance of economic evidence to guide decisions in health systems facing economic constraints, it is imperative that these challenges be considered so that this population is not left out of evidence-based decisions. The time has come for a textbook to address economic evaluationin child health.This book is divided into three sections: Methods, Applications, and Using evidence for decision-making, with chapters contributed by international experts. The Methods section presents detailed discussions of measuring lifetime costs and consequences, capturing productivity losses, obtainingunbiased self- and proxy reports, incorporating externalities, choosing valid outcome measures, assessing utility, and designing studies using value of information. The Applications section reviews economic evidence in common childhood conditions and areas of investigation, including newbornscreening, harm prevention, mental health services, brain injury, asthma, and immunization. The final section explores the use of economic evidence in decision-making, and includes a description of the WHO-CHOICE approach, the role of clinical research, how to value health gains by children, and theemerging field of health technology assessment. In addition to an emphasis on methods, a deliberate effort was made to include issues relevant to developing countries, where the burden of childhood disease is greatest, and for whom high quality economic evidence is critical.

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Guidelines for conducting health economic evaluations have become increasingly standardized, however they don't address the unique concerns of the paediatric population. The challenges of measuring costs and consequences in children, from neonate to late adolescence, are numerous and complex.With the growing acceptance of economic evid...

Wendy Ungar MSc, PhD is a Senior Scientist in Child Health Evaluative Sciences at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, an Associate Professor in Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, and an Adjunct Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada. Dr. Ungar is the Univ...
Format:PaperbackDimensions:328 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.03 inPublished:November 8, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199547491

ISBN - 13:9780199547494

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Table of Contents

Part I: Methods1. Wendy J. Ungar and Andreas Gerber: The uniqueness of child health and challenges to measuring costs and consequences2. Katherine B. Bevans and Christopher B. Forrest: The reliability and validity of children's and adolescents' self-reported health3. Werner B.F. Brouwer, N. Job A. van Exel and J. Mick Tilford: Incorporating caregiver and family effects in economic evaluations of child health4. Lillian Sung, Stavros Petrou and Wendy J. Ungar: Measurement of health utilities in children5. Andrew R Willan: The use of value of information methods in the design and evaluation of clinical trialsPart II: Applications6. Scott D. Grosse: Economic evaluations of newborn screening7. Kim Dalziel and Leonie Segal: Economic evaluation in child protection: what are the special challenges? Part 1. Economic evaluation in child protectionE. Michael Foster: Economic evaluation in child protection: what are the special challenges? Part 2. Economic evaluation in child welfareY. Ingrid Goh, Gideon Koren and Wendy J. Ungar: Economic evaluation in child protection: what are the special challenges? Part 3. Economic evaluation in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder8. Sarah Byford: Obstacles to the economic evaluation of specialist child and adolescent mental health services9. J. Mick Tilford and Ali I. Raja: Is more aggressive treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury worth it?10. Jonathan D. Campbell and Sean D. Sullivan: Economic evaluations in the management of paediatric asthma11. Damian G Walker, Philippe Beutels and Raymond Hutubessy: Economic evaluation of childhood vaccines12. Donald S. Shepard and Jose A. Suaya: Economic evaluation of dengue preventionPart III: Using Evidence for Decision-Making13. Tessa Tan-Torres Edejer, Moses Aikins, Robert Black, Lara Wolfson, Raymond Hutubessy and David B. Evans: Economic evaluations of interventions for children in the developing world: the WHO-CHOICE approach14. Gillian Currie, Sarah Curtis and Terry Klassen: Evidence-based decision-making in child health: the role of clinical research and economic evaluation15. Stavros Petrou: Should health gains by children be given the same value as health gains by adults in an economic evaluation framework?16. Vania Costa and Wendy J. Ungar: Health technology assessment in child health