Economic History Of Virginia In The Seventeenth Century; An Inquiry Into The Material Condition Of…

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byPhilip Alexander Bruce

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...represented in the burden of each ship arriving. It was permitted, however, to a master of a vessel to settle these duties in money sterling or in bills of exchange.1 Many owners of ships engaged in the trade with Virginia complained in the following year that it was a great hardship to require them to pay twelve pence as a castle duty upon every ton of merchandise they imported, and they petitioned that instead they should be allowed to deliver half a pound of powder and three pounds of lead towards the defence of the plantations.2 This request apparently failed to receive a favorable response. In 1680, the amount which it was optional for the shipowners to substitute for powder and shot was fixed at one shilling and three pence a ton.3 A tonnage tax of fifteen pence was imposed upon every vessel arriving in the Colony towards the end of the century.4 A present of liquor or provisions to the Governor by the shipmaster on anchoring, which in the beginning was a mere act of courtesy,5 came in time to be a recognized charge, amounting to twenty shillings on each vessel above one hundred tons and thirty shillings if under. Culpeper remitted the gift in consideration of the payment of its value in tobacco or coin.6 1 British State Papers, Colonial; McDonald Papers, vol. VII, pp. 261, 262, Va. State Library. 2 In addition to the castle duty, even the ships belonging to Virginians had to pay 2s. Od. for entry, 2s. Od. for license to trades, and 2s. Gd. for clearing. Hening's Statutes, vol. II, p. 387. The cocquet rates were a halfpenny per hhd. for all bills of lading not containing above 20 hhd.; twelve pence for every cocquet if exceeding that number. Ibid., p. 387. 8 Hening's Statutes, vol. I, p. 176; Letter of Governor Harris to Dorchester,...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...represented in the burden of each ship arriving. It was permitted, however, to a master of a vessel to settle t...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:222 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.47 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217708846

ISBN - 13:9780217708845

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