Economics Of Institutional Change: Central and Eastern Europe Revisited by Tomasz MickiewiczEconomics Of Institutional Change: Central and Eastern Europe Revisited by Tomasz Mickiewicz

Economics Of Institutional Change: Central and Eastern Europe Revisited

byTomasz Mickiewicz

Hardcover | August 11, 2010

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This book, a second edition, has been significantly expanded and updated. It revisits the process of institutional change: its characteristics, determinants and implications for economic performance.
Professor Tomasz Mickiewicz is a professor of Economics, and Head of the Economics, Finance and Entrepreneurship Group at Aston University, UK. He teaches on emerging and transitional economics, and his research interests include comparative entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, high growth aspiration entrepreneurship, informal ec...
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Title:Economics Of Institutional Change: Central and Eastern Europe RevisitedFormat:HardcoverDimensions:324 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.73 inPublished:August 11, 2010Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230242626

ISBN - 13:9780230242623

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Table of Contents

Introduction.- .Chapter 1: Transition away from the Command Economy in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union - An Overview.- .Chapter 2: The Soviet System.- .Chapter 3: Institutions; Institutional Reform.- .Chapter 4: Political Economy of Reforms.- .Chapter 5: Stabilisation.- .Chapter 6: Outcomes of Reforms. Growth.- .Chapter 7: Privatisation: Speed, Efficiency, and Effects on Wealth Distribution.- .Chapter 8: Unemployment and Labour Market Policies.- .Chapter 9: Financial Liberalisation.- .Chapter 10: Public Finance.- .Chapter 11: Transition and Institutional Change.- .Chapter 12: Back to "Normality"?