Education, Asylum and the 'Non-Citizen' Child: The Politics of Compassion and Belonging by H. PinsonEducation, Asylum and the 'Non-Citizen' Child: The Politics of Compassion and Belonging by H. Pinson

Education, Asylum and the 'Non-Citizen' Child: The Politics of Compassion and Belonging

byH. Pinson, M. Arnot, M. Candappa

Hardcover | April 29, 2010

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Refugees are physically and symbolically 'out of place' - their presence forces governments to address issues of rights and moral obligations. This book contrasts the hostility of immigration policy to 'non-citizen' children with teachers' exceptional compassion and 'citizen students' ambivalence in defining who can belong.
HALLELI PINSON is Lecturer at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Research Fellow at the Van-Leer Jerusalem Institute, Israel. Her research focuses on young people's political identities, citizenship education and social conflict and the interface between government immigration and educational policy in the UK. She recently won the ...
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Title:Education, Asylum and the 'Non-Citizen' Child: The Politics of Compassion and BelongingFormat:HardcoverDimensions:259 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.81 inPublished:April 29, 2010Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230524680

ISBN - 13:9780230524682

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Table of Contents

Introduction Globalisation and Forced Migration: Challenging National Institutions Researching Compassion and Belonging in the Educational System The Asylum-seeking Child as Migrant: Government Strategies Devolution and Incorporation: Whose Responsibility? Countering Hostility with Social Inclusion: Local Resistances The Migrant Child as a Learner Citizen Finding Security and Safety in Schools Britishness and Belonging The Politicisation of Compassion: Campaigning for Justice Conclusions