Effective Learning and Teaching in Engineering by Caroline BaillieEffective Learning and Teaching in Engineering by Caroline Baillie

Effective Learning and Teaching in Engineering

EditorCaroline Baillie, Ivan Moore

Paperback | October 28, 2004

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Written to meet the need of teachers, lecturers and tutors at all stages in their career, this is the authoritative handbook for anyone wanting to and understanding the key issues, best practices and new developments in the world of engineering education and training.
The book is divided into sections which analyse what students should be learning, how they learn, and how the teaching and learning process and your own practice can be improved.
With contributions from experts around the world and a wealth of innovative case study material, this book is an essential purchase for anyone teaching engineering today.
The 'Effective Learning and Teaching in Higher Education' series deals with improving practice in higher education. Each title is written to meet the needs of those seeking professional accreditation and wishing to keep themselves up to date professionally.
Caroline Baillie is Dupont Chair in Engineering Education Research and Development at the Faculty of Applied Science, Queens University, Ontario, Canada. Ivan Moore was formerly Director of the Department for Learning Development at University of Portsmouth, UK.
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Title:Effective Learning and Teaching in EngineeringFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.7 inPublished:October 28, 2004Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415334896

ISBN - 13:9780415334891

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Editorial Reviews

'This book would be a good purchase for those interested in expanding their teaching horizons.' - Chris Davies, Materials World, December 2005