Egypt To-day; The First To The Third Khedive

Paperback | January 3, 2012

byWilliam Fraser Rae

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Book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1892. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XI. EGYPTIAN COURTS OF JUSTICE. Lord Dufferin wrote in 1883 that "the chief requirement of Egypt is Justice." He informed Lord Granville that he hoped, before leaving the country, to see it "endowed with a justice that shall be pure, cheap, simple, and rapid." He had good reason for desiring such a consummation, as at that time upwards of two thousand persons were awaiting trial, many of whom had been several years in prison, while six thousand civil suits were pending before the dilatory provincial courts. The want of a rational system Of law impartially administered had been a grievance of the Egyptians long before Lord Dufferin prepared his memorable report. The arbitrary will of a single man, cruelly put in practice, had usurped the place of justice between man and man. However, there had been an improvement several years before his arrival, and cases of a revolting character had become rarer. Few rulers after Mehemet Al i dared to act as Belzoni records that Mehemet's son Ibrahim did while Governor of Upper Egypt. When an unfortunate culprit was brought before Ibrahim, he asked a few questions, and then sent him to the Cadi, "this being the signal for taking the culprit to a particular cannon, to the mouth of which he was tied; it was then fired off, loaded with a ball, so that the body was scattered about in pieces at a considerable distance. In the case of two Arabs who had killed a soldier, not without provocation, this Pasha had them fastened to a pole, like two rabbits on a spit, and roasted alive at a slow fire."* Atrocious punishments like the foregoing were not regarded with as great horror by the Egyptians of a former generation as they would excite if perpetrated now. Even before Ibrahim succeeded his father the administration of justice had become milder, tho...

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Book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1892. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XI. EGYPTIAN COURTS OF JUSTICE. Lord Dufferin wrote in 1883 that "the chief requirement of Egypt is Justice." He informed Lord Granville that he h...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:84 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.17 inPublished:January 3, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217928781

ISBN - 13:9780217928786

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