Eisenhower And Berlin 1945: The Decision to Halt at the Elbe by Stephen E AmbroseEisenhower And Berlin 1945: The Decision to Halt at the Elbe by Stephen E Ambrose

Eisenhower And Berlin 1945: The Decision to Halt at the Elbe

byStephen E Ambrose

Paperback | May 30, 2000

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Behind this decision lay another. Whose forces would be the first to reach Berlin? General Dwight David Eisenhower, supreme commander of the British and American armies, chose to halt at the Elbe River and leave Berlin to the Red Army. Could he have beaten the Russians to Berlin? If so, why didn't he? If he had, would the Berlin question have arisen? Would Germany have been divided as it was? Would the Cold War have assumed a direction more favorable to the West? In a narrative of steady fascination, Stephen E. Ambrose describes both the political and the military aspects of the situation, sketches the key players, explains the alternatives, and considers the results. The result is a sharply focused light on an important question of the postwar world. This paperback edition features a new introduction by the author.
The distinguished historian Stephen E. Ambrose is the author of several best-selling books on World War II and was an editor of the Eisenhower Papers.
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Title:Eisenhower And Berlin 1945: The Decision to Halt at the ElbeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:120 pages, 5.62 × 8.37 × 0.38 inPublished:May 30, 2000Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393320103

ISBN - 13:9780393320107

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In the final months of the Second World War, a major decision had to be made: where to draw a stop line so that the Russian and Anglo-American armies wouldn’t accidentally clash, and who should enter Berlin first. General Dwight David Eisenhower, supreme commander of the British and American armies, decided to let the Russians take Berlin but could he have beat them there? And, if he had, would the Berlin question have risen? Would the Cold War have gone differently? In Eisenhower and Berlin, 1945, Stephen E. Ambrose examines the political and military sides of the situation