Ejo: Poems, Rwanda, 1991?1994

Paperback | October 6, 2000

byDerick Burleson

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In 1994 the worst episode of genocide since the Holocaust of the Second World War ravaged the Central African country of Rwanda. Derick Burleson lived there and taught at the National University during the two years leading up to the genocide. The poems in this collection explore the cataclysm in a variety of forms and voices through the culture, myths, and customs he absorbed during this time. Ejo, meaning "yesterday and tomorrow" in Kinyarwandan, celebrates in language both lyrical and austere the lives of the friends Burleson made in Rwanda, those who survived to tell their own stories, and those whose voices were silenced.

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In 1994 the worst episode of genocide since the Holocaust of the Second World War ravaged the Central African country of Rwanda. Derick Burleson lived there and taught at the National University during the two years leading up to the genocide. The poems in this collection explore the cataclysm in a variety of forms and voices through t...

Derick Burleson and his wife Anita Leverich lived in Rwanda from 1991 to 1993 where they taught English at the National University. A recipient of a 1999 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Burleson is currently completing a Ph.D. in Creative Writing  at the University of Houston.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:80 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.1 inPublished:October 6, 2000Publisher:University of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299170241

ISBN - 13:9780299170240

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"Burleson is the poet in Rwanda the way Vallejo was the poet in Paris and Neruda the poet in Malaysia: in the running, up the country, on the scene. The lines are scrupulous, the movement scriptural in its inclusive justice. This is a very old and honorable poetry, a poetry of news, outraged and doleful, longing for acquittal."—Richard Howard