Elite Statecraft and Election Administration: Bending the Rules of the Game?

Hardcover | September 4, 2012

byToby S. James

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The way in which elections are run is changing, as radical reforms or experiments have been introduced across the world. This book establishes why election administration might be used by political elites to win and maintain power. It identifies the role of elite interests in shaping election administration in USA, UK and Ireland.

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The way in which elections are run is changing, as radical reforms or experiments have been introduced across the world. This book establishes why election administration might be used by political elites to win and maintain power. It identifies the role of elite interests in shaping election administration in USA, UK and Ireland.

TOBY S. JAMES is Lecturer in the School of Political, Social and International Studies at the University of East Anglia. He has published on electoral institutions and governance, political leaders and the policy process. He was previously a British Research Council Scholar in the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, Washington D....

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:296 pages, 8.87 × 5.69 × 1.02 inPublished:September 4, 2012Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230308422

ISBN - 13:9780230308428

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Election Administration and Electoral Studies: Theories, Frameworks and Anomalies
Election Administration – a Tool for Political Statecraft?
The Statecraft Approach: Bringing Political Elites Back In
'Stopping the Vote':  Election Administration in the USA
'Modernising' Elections? Election Administration in Britain
'Our silly aul' pencils': Election Administration in Ireland
Agendas, Systems and Processes: Elite Strategy and Election Administration in Comparative Perspective
Conclusions and Lessons for Theorists and Constitutional Designers

Editorial Reviews

"Toby James has written an important book. Election administration has been a neglected subject but, as James demonstrates, by ignoring the intricacies of how elections are managed and run we are ignoring an important aspect of politics and power. As this well written and informative book demonstrates, the rules of elections affect the outcome and the book does an excellent job in drawing out attention to running of elections. It also highlights how, when thinking about constitutional reform we need to think about how citizens vote." - Martin J. Smith, Professor, University of Sheffield, UK "Elite Statecraft and Election Administration presents an innovative integration of election administration and politics to present a framework for evaluating administrative arrangements and for explaining when these arrangements will change. This book is important for understanding cross-national variations in the ways in which elections are run." - Thad Hall, Professor, University of Utah, USA"The book makes a crucial contribution to our understanding of the politics of election administration. James makes a compelling case that election administration matters, that it can affect turnout or electoral outcomes, and that party elites seek to manipulate election administration to further their own interests. This is the first in-depth comparative examination of continuity and change in election administration in three different democracies (USA, UK, and Ireland). This is a masterful study." - André Blais, Canada Research Chair in Electoral Studies, Université de Montréal