Ellen Terry: Player In Her Time by Nina AuerbachEllen Terry: Player In Her Time by Nina Auerbach

Ellen Terry: Player In Her Time

byNina Auerbach

Paperback | January 31, 1997

Pricing and Purchase Info

$35.15 online 
$39.50 list price save 11%
Earn 176 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Nina Auerbach brilliantly reveals the Ellen Terry whose roles, on stage and off, embodied everything that a rapidly changing world exhorted women to be.
Title:Ellen Terry: Player In Her TimeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:528 pages, 9.1 × 6.05 × 1.25 inPublished:January 31, 1997Publisher:University of Pennsylvania Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:081221613X

ISBN - 13:9780812216134

Reviews

From Our Editors

She was one of the most beloved figures of her time and, after Queen Victoria, the highest-paid working woman in the realm. A boyish child actress in the 1850s, she subdued her energy until her eerie beauty made her the center of an aesthetic cult in the 1870s and '80s. In the 1890s she radiated a queenly benevolence as reigning female star of Henry Irving's Lyceum Theatre; later, as the new century veered out of control, she would exude maternal comfort to men like J.M. Barrie and George Bernard Shaw, while becoming an austere oracle to a circle of militant new women led by her daughter, Edy Craig. She held a place in the pantheon of great actresses alongside Sarah Bernhardt and Eleonora Duse. She was Ellen Terry, consummate player. Nina Auerbach brilliantly reveals the Ellen Terry whose roles, on stage and off, embodied everything that a rapidly changing world exhorted women to be

Editorial Reviews

"One of the finest examples I know of theatre biography as cultural history. . . . Auerbach's force of feeling . . . [makes us] understand Terry's career as the bowdlerized body of woman's expressive genius in the Victorian age. . . . A life-and-times classic that will become a model for other feminist work."--Jane Marcus, "Women's Review of Books"