Eloquence in an Electronic Age: The Transformation of Political Speechmaking by Kathleen Hall Jamieson

Eloquence in an Electronic Age: The Transformation of Political Speechmaking

byKathleen Hall Jamieson

Paperback | April 1, 1995

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In a book that blends anecdote with analysis, Kathleen Hall Jamieson--author of the award-winning Packaging the Presidency--offers a perceptive and often disturbing account of the transformation of political speechmaking. Jamieson addresses such fundamental issues about public speaking as what talents and techniques differentiate eloquent speakers from non-eloquent speakers. She also analyzes the speeches of modern presidents from Truman to Reagan and of political players from Daniel Webster to Mario Cuomo.Ranging from the classical orations of Cicero to Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech, this lively, well-documented volume contains a wealth of insight into public speaking, contemporary characteristics of eloquence, and the future of political discourse in America.

About The Author

Kathleen Hall Jamieson is Professor of Communication and Dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of several books, including Presidential Debates.

Details & Specs

Title:Eloquence in an Electronic Age: The Transformation of Political SpeechmakingFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 5.39 × 7.99 × 0.67 inPublished:April 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195063171

ISBN - 13:9780195063172

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From Our Editors

In a book that blends anecdote with analysis, Kathleen Hall Jamieson-author of the award -winning Packaging the Presidency-offers a perceptive and often disturbing account of the transformation of political speechmaking. Ranging from the classical orations of Cicero to the speeches of modern presidents from Truman to Reagan and of political players from Daniel Webster to Mario Cuomo, this lively, well-documented volume contains a wealth of insight into public speaking, contemporary characteristics of eloquence, and the future of political discourse in America.

Editorial Reviews

"I'm extremely pleased by the integration of rhetorical theory with practical concerns of providing explanation and advice about political advice."--John McKiernan, University of South Dakota