Emily Dickinson's Rich Conversation: Poetry, Philosophy, Science

by Richard E. Brantley

Palgrave Macmillan | June 13, 2013 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

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Emily Dickinson's Rich Conversation: Poetry, Philosophy, Science accounts for Dickinson's aesthetic and intellectual life. Her dialogue with Wordsworth's 'natural methodism,' Emerson's subject/object dynamic, Locke's rational empiricism, and Darwin's evolutionary biology substitutes faith in experience for the 'Experiential Faith' of her Anglo-American heritage. Yet her variation on realism, rather more tough-mindedly than her precursors and contemporaries in belles and bonnes lettres, keeps optimism and hope in play. Even the pre-Modern tone of her recurrent pessimism can participate in late-Romantic resilience and models survival through adaptation. Thus Dickinson speaks to all who would take heart from her watchword: 'Experiment escorts us last.'

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: June 13, 2013

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1137237309

ISBN - 13: 9781137237309

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Kobo eBookEmily Dickinson's Rich Conversation: Poetry, Philosophy, Science

Emily Dickinson's Rich Conversation: Poetry, Philosophy, Science

by Richard E. Brantley

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: June 13, 2013

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1137237309

ISBN - 13: 9781137237309

From the Publisher

Emily Dickinson's Rich Conversation: Poetry, Philosophy, Science accounts for Dickinson's aesthetic and intellectual life. Her dialogue with Wordsworth's 'natural methodism,' Emerson's subject/object dynamic, Locke's rational empiricism, and Darwin's evolutionary biology substitutes faith in experience for the 'Experiential Faith' of her Anglo-American heritage. Yet her variation on realism, rather more tough-mindedly than her precursors and contemporaries in belles and bonnes lettres, keeps optimism and hope in play. Even the pre-Modern tone of her recurrent pessimism can participate in late-Romantic resilience and models survival through adaptation. Thus Dickinson speaks to all who would take heart from her watchword: 'Experiment escorts us last.'