Emma; A Novel. In Three Volumes Volume 1

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byJane Austen

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1816 edition. Excerpt: ...time for beaming. Trust to me." "Oh! Miss Woodhouse, what a pity that I must not write this beautiful charade into my book! I am sure I have not got one half so good." "Leave out the two last lines, and there is no reason why you should not write it into your book." "Oh! but those two lines are" i: The best of all. Granted;--for private enjoyment; and for private enjoyment keep them. They are not at all the less written you know, because you divide them. The couplet does not cease to be, nor does its meaning change. But take it away, and all appropriation ceases, and a very pretty gallant charade remains, fit for any collection. Depend upon it, he would not like to have his charade slighted, much better than his passion. A poet A poet in love must be encouraged in both capacities, or neither. Give me the book, I will write it clown, and then there can be no possible reflection on you." Harriet submitted, though her mind could hardly separate the parts, so as to feel quite sure that her friend were not writing down a declaration of love. It seemed too precious an offering for any degree of publicity. "I shall never let that book go out of my own hands," said she. "Very well," replied Emma, "a most natural feeling; and the longer it lasts, the better I shall be pleased. But here is my father coming: you will not object to my reading the charade to him. It will be giving him so much pleasure! He love any thing of the sort, and especially any thing that pays woman a compliment. He has the tenderest spirit of gallantry towards us all!--You must let me read it to him." Harriet Harriet looked grave. "My dear Harriet, you must not refine too much upon this charade.--You will betray your feelings improperly, if you are too conscious and too quick,...

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1816 edition. Excerpt: ...time for beaming. Trust to me." "Oh! Miss Woodhouse, what a pity that I must not write this beautiful charade i...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:48 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.1 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217712657

ISBN - 13:9780217712651

Customer Reviews of Emma; A Novel. In Three Volumes Volume 1

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read While this is not my favourite Jane Austen novel, it is still a good read.
Date published: 2017-01-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from One of Jane Austen's best. This is a book I re-read several times, and I'm sure I will again. Emma is a realistic, flawed being. She is kind-hearted, but can be harsh and prejudiced.
Date published: 2017-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read all of Jane Austen You will never be disappointed when reading a novel by Jane Austen, she was the greatest writer of our time.
Date published: 2017-01-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ok Found it hard to get through the old style of writing but will try another
Date published: 2016-12-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book If you liked Pride & Prejudice you will like this.
Date published: 2016-12-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from 4 Stars Emma, after Pride & Prejudice, is my favourite Jane Austen novel. It is too lengthy for comfort but the heroine is equally as bold as Elizabeth Bennet but far more childish and, at times, socially inappropriate. Regarding the character of Emma Woodhouse, Jane Austen stated "I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like." You may not like Emma Woodhouse but she is a highly spirited, independent girl who likes to take things into her own hands. Her hasty assumptions and actions drive the story as she acts as a matchmaker to her friends and acquaintances, determined she can see love when she cannot even spot the love that a close friend, George Knightley, has for her. This is also a story of a young, slightly selfish, slightly spoiled girl who comes to realize her own faults and necessity to become a better person. Emma is a wonderful classic.
Date published: 2016-12-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Another classic This is another classic Jane Austen book. Well written.
Date published: 2016-12-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Worth it! Anything Jane Austen is worth reading! #plumreview
Date published: 2016-12-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from very good you can't go wrong with jane austen. loved this classic
Date published: 2016-12-01
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It's all in how you look at it I can understand why people might get annoyed with this book; the 'voice-box' characters are quite overwhelming. But when you realize that that is exactly what Jane Austen was writing a commentary about, it becomes an amusing comedy of manners. Quite good.
Date published: 2016-11-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from we are all emma I love Emma's character arc.
Date published: 2016-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Lovely book Jane Austen's writing frequently doesn't get the recognition it deserves.
Date published: 2016-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Classic Every girl needs to read emma! Austen is amazing
Date published: 2016-11-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved it. Great book, great read. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Written in a lighter way, it should be taken lightly! The last of her novels published when she was alive, Jane Austen’s Emma depicts the life of this 21 year-old woman, who lives with her father assuming the role of mistress of the house. As one of the “belles” of Highbury she believes herself entitle to every of her fantasies, including matchmaking just about everyone. The long-time family friend Mr Knightley does not approve of all this, especially when it concerns the projects she has for the future of Harriet Smith or the fancy she takes to Mr Frank Churchill. But it seems that nothing is to stop her, except maybe love... I used to think this longest novel, the less of 2 evils when compared to Mansfield Park but I must admit that on the second reading, I like it less that I thought I originally did. Probably because of all the 6 novels, this one is the lightest of all in terms of its characters psyche. You do not need to as dig deep to understand the essence of Emma Woodhouse's character, as you would have with others. Everything is written on the surface, which is why I recommend you read it in a very light mood, a vacation mood. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog : ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it This is a timeless classic. A girl who has it all gets put in her place even though she is trying to improve other people's lives. Instead of letting the cards fall she tries to intervene and find things out about her own life.
Date published: 2011-05-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I was hoping for a bit more. Emma has no intention of ever marrying and she considers herself a very good matchmaker amongst her friends. Of course, she is not nearly as good a matchmaker as she thinks she is and manages to mess up a few times and she misses seeing things between people. I was hoping for more. I liked parts of it, but my mind wandered throughout a lot of the book, too. It seemed if the focus was on particular characters (Harriet, Frank Churchill, sometimes Mr. Knightley), it kept my attention a bit more. I was interested at the start and at the end, and when the aforementioned characters were involved in the storyline, but otherwise, I got a bit bored at times and couldn't always pay attention to it.
Date published: 2011-03-20