Emperors and Lawyers: With a Palingenesia of Third-Century Imperial Rescripts 193-305 AD by Tony Honore

Emperors and Lawyers: With a Palingenesia of Third-Century Imperial Rescripts 193-305 AD

byTony Honore

Hardcover | September 1, 1980

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This is the second edition of an original and controversial book. It analyses some 2,609 legal rulings (rescripts) given by Roman Emperors between 193 and 305 AD, and argues that, though issued in the name of emperors, they were really both in style and substance the work of professionallawyers. From their style we can detect when one lawyer-draftsman gave way to another, we can identify some of the lawyers and we can allot most of the rescripts to their real author. On this basis the author argues that in the third century there was a convention that the rights of citizens wouldbe governed by objective legal standards. The Roman Empire was not a pure autocracy.Updated and in large part rewritten, this edition includes on a high-density diskette a reconstruction (Palingenesia) of the 2,609 rescripts. This new and original work of reference will enable scholars to read the texts chronologically and to judge the soundness of the arguments advanced.

About The Author

Tony Honore is a sometime Regius Professor of Civil Law, Emeritus Professor at University of Oxford.

Details & Specs

Title:Emperors and Lawyers: With a Palingenesia of Third-Century Imperial Rescripts 193-305 ADFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.91 inPublished:September 1, 1980Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198257694

ISBN - 13:9780198257691

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`'This edition is about a third longer than the first, and the lines of argument are fuller and clearer...The arguments presented are considerably more powerful than in the first edition,''The Classical Review