Enchantment and Exploitation: The Life and Hard Times of a New Mexico Mountain Range, Revised and Expanded Edition by William deBuysEnchantment and Exploitation: The Life and Hard Times of a New Mexico Mountain Range, Revised and Expanded Edition by William deBuys

Enchantment and Exploitation: The Life and Hard Times of a New Mexico Mountain Range, Revised and…

byWilliam deBuys

Paperback | December 15, 2015

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First published in 1985, William deBuys?s Enchantment and Exploitation has become a New Mexico classic. It offers a complete account of the relationship between society and environment in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico, a region unique in its rich combination of ecological and cultural diversity. Now, more than thirty years later, this revised and expanded edition provides a long-awaited assessment of the quality of the journey that New Mexican society has traveled in that time?and continues to travel.

In a new final chapter deBuys examines ongoing transformations in the mountains? natural systems?including, most notably, developments related to wildfires?with significant implications for both the land and the people who depend on it. As the climate absorbs the effects of an industrial society, deBuys argues, we can no longer expect the environmental future to be a reiteration of the environmental past.

Title:Enchantment and Exploitation: The Life and Hard Times of a New Mexico Mountain Range, Revised and…Format:PaperbackDimensions:384 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:December 15, 2015Publisher:University Of New Mexico PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0826353428

ISBN - 13:9780826353429

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

?William deBuys is a nature writer who brings clear and deep insights to his subjects. . . . [Enchantment and Exploitation] tells the long, twin, interlaced stories of the human history and the natural history of northern New Mexico through the lens of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.?
?Albuquerque Journal