Energy Science: Principles, technologies, and impacts

Paperback | March 27, 2013

byJohn Andrews, Nick Jelley

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Do renewable energy sources really provide a realistic alternative to fossil fuels? How much power can be obtained from all the various forms of energy? Can global warming be combated with the energy technologies currently available?Energy Science: Principles, Technologies, and Impacts enables the reader to evaluate the key sources of energy available to us today on the basis of sound, quantitative understanding. Covering renewable, fossil fuel, and nuclear energy sources, the book relates the science behind these sources tothe environmental and socioeconomic issues which surround their use to provide a balanced, objective overview. It also explores the practicalities of energy generation, storage, and transmission, to build a complete picture of energy supply, from wind turbines, nuclear reactors, or hydroelectricdams, to our homes.Different energy sources have different social, environmental, and economic impacts. The authors use examples and case studies throughout to help the reader make quantitative estimates and critically assess the information to hand in order to reach a well-rounded, informed view of the relativemerits and drawbacks of the energy sources available. The problems with current and future energy use and supply extend globally; Energy Science: Principles, Technologies, and Impacts introduces the potential solutions that science can offer, within a framework that encourages the critical assessment of the pros and cons of each. Online Resource Centre:The Online Resource Centre to accompany Energy Systems features:For students:* Multiple choice questions to check your understanding as you progress through the textFor registered adopters of the book:* Figures from the book available to download, to facilitate lecture preparation* Solutions to end of chapter questions, to aid marking and assessment

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From the Publisher

Do renewable energy sources really provide a realistic alternative to fossil fuels? How much power can be obtained from all the various forms of energy? Can global warming be combated with the energy technologies currently available?Energy Science: Principles, Technologies, and Impacts enables the reader to evaluate the key sources of ...

John Andrews is Visiting Fellow at Bristol University, UK. Nick Jelley is Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford and Fellow at Lincoln College, UK.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:424 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.07 inPublished:March 27, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199592373

ISBN - 13:9780199592371

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. Thermal energy3. Energy from fossil fuels4. Essential fluid mechanics for energy conversion5. Hydropower, tidal power, and wave power6. Wind Power7. Solar energy8. Biomass9. Energy from fission10. Energy from fusion11. Electricity and energy storage12. Energy and society

Editorial Reviews

"As educators what we need is a good source of information to examine competing ideas and to show students what sort of questions need to be asked. This is a very useful text. Its value lies in the degree to which the science of energy is inter-linked with issues of safety, environment etc.For those aiming to deal with this area in more detail than normally found, this is a very good place to start." --Ecological and Environmental Education, February 2007