Engendering Business: Men And Women In The Corporate Office, 1870-1930 by Angel Kwolek-FollandEngendering Business: Men And Women In The Corporate Office, 1870-1930 by Angel Kwolek-Folland

Engendering Business: Men And Women In The Corporate Office, 1870-1930

byAngel Kwolek-Folland

Paperback | March 20, 1998

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In Engendering Business, Angel Kwolek-Folland challenges the notion that neutral market forces shaped American business, arguing instead for the central importance of gender in the rise of the modern corporation. She presents a detailed view of the gendered development of management and male-female job segmentation, while also examining the role of gender in such areas as architectural space, office clothing, and office workers' leisure activities.

Angel Kwolek-Folland is associate professor of history at the University of Kansas.
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Title:Engendering Business: Men And Women In The Corporate Office, 1870-1930Format:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:March 20, 1998Publisher:Johns Hopkins University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801859484

ISBN - 13:9780801859489

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Reviews

From Our Editors

"Drawing on a range of primary sources including the archives of major companies, personal papers, trade magazines, photographs, and recorded anecdotes of turn-of-century life and using the extensive secondary literature on women, sex roles, women's work, manhood, business history and material culture, Angel Kwolek-Folland has built up an intricate picture of office life ... (that) is both challenging and innovative" -- Business HistoryIn Engendering Business, Angel Kwolek-Folland challenges the notion that neutral market forces shaped American business, arguing instead for the central importance of gender in the rise of the modern corporation. She presents a detailed view of the gendered development of management and male-female job segmentation, while also examining the role of gender in such areas as architectural space, office clothing, and office workers' leisure activities.

Editorial Reviews

This superb study persuasively argues that debates about and meanings of womanhood and manhood shaped corporate America... Kwolek-Folland's approach is unique because she spotlights the corporation itself in all of its manifestations and activities. Her fresh look yields rich results: we'll never be able to think about stages of US corporate development in the same way again.