England In 1815: A Critical Edition of The Journal of Joseph Ballard by A. Rauch

England In 1815: A Critical Edition of The Journal of Joseph Ballard

EditorA. Rauch, Alan

Hardcover | January 8, 2009

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In 1815, amidst the decline of George III, the scandals of the Regency, and the defeat of Napoleon, a 26-year-old Bostonian named Joseph Ballard toured Great Britain and left a complete record of his impressions. Ballard was officially part of the effort to reestablish trade with Britain following the war of 1812, but it is also clear that he was eager to get a closer look at “mother” England now that the last vestiges of colonial ties had been severed. Ballard’s journal is an engaging and lively narrative full of period detail, and it offers fascinating insights into British and American society during a critical era for both nations. This edition presents the journal in its entirety, along with invaluable historical and cultural context that make clear the unique significance of Ballard’s account.

About The Author

Alan Rauch is an associate professor of English at UNC Charlotte, where he holds joint appointments in the History and Women’s Studies departments.

Details & Specs

Title:England In 1815: A Critical Edition of The Journal of Joseph BallardFormat:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.02 inPublished:January 8, 2009Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230601480

ISBN - 13:9780230601482

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Editorial Reviews

"An amusing and interesting account of cultural encounter, Joseph Ballard's account provides sharp observerations on everything from architecture to Zaphna portraits, pleasure gardens to prisons, capturing the collision of high and low culture that was so characteristic of late Georgian London. Supplemented with useful editorial apparatus, it provides an excellent window into discussion and debate on British and American history and the study of cultural difference."--Kathleen Wilson, State University of New York, Stony Brook