English Dictionaries, 800-1700: The Topical Tradition

Paperback | March 16, 2006

byWerner Hullen

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From the Anglo-Saxons to the end of the Tudor era, many English glossaries and dictionaries were arranged topically rather than alphabetically and thus reflected the prevailing concerns of theology, philosophy, and natural history. These works are a fascinating part of the topical oronomasiological lexicographical tradition in England. In this book Werner Hullen presents a learned and readable account of the topical tradition's principles and origins. He considers early glossaries, treatises for the learning of foreign languages, and didactic dialogues, and provides in-depthexaminations of later, more comprehensive works. He shows that the English tradition is embedded in a rich European tradition whose important representatives, such as Junius and Comenius, had a marked influence on the English methods. The book makes an important contribution to the history of theEnglish lexicon and English semantics, and to the study of English lexicography. It also reveals a great deal about the history of English ideas over nine centuries. "This is a work of enormously broad scholarship, which brings together a range of quite diverse elements into a coherent narrative which makes for absorbing and often surprisingly entertaining reading..... This is a rich and multifaceted book, and one which will appeal to a variety of audiences."International Journal of Lexicography"Hullen brings to life relatively dry and difficult material by applying modern techniques to remote frameworks (such as conversation analysis to Caxton's Dialogues, feminist linguistics to Withals's Dictionarie, and semiotic theory to Wilkins's Philosophical Language and Comenius's Visiable World),setting new standards for research in dictionary history." Anglistik. Mitteilungen des deutschen Anglistenverbandes

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From the Anglo-Saxons to the end of the Tudor era, many English glossaries and dictionaries were arranged topically rather than alphabetically and thus reflected the prevailing concerns of theology, philosophy, and natural history. These works are a fascinating part of the topical oronomasiological lexicographical tradition in England....

Werner Hullen is Professor Emeritus of English Linguistics at the University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany. He has published widely on the history of linguistics, including lexicography, and on the teaching and learning of English as a foreign language. His monograph Their Manner of Discourse: Nachdenken uber Sprache im Umkreis der Royal...

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Hardcover|Aug 1 2009

$93.42 online$102.95list price(save 9%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:544 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.23 inPublished:March 16, 2006Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199291047

ISBN - 13:9780199291045

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Table of Contents

Part A Opening the Topic1. The Onomasiological Approach2. On Establishing a TraditionPart B The English Tradition of Onomasiology3. Hermeneumata, Latin-English Glosses, and RINominales4. Colloquies, Wordbooks, and Dialogues for Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages5. Treatises on Terminology6. John Withals' Dictionary for Young Boys (1553)7. James Howell's Dictionary for the Genteel (1660)8. John Wilkins' Comprehensive Thesaurus of English (1668)Part C The European Scene9. Multilingual Dictionaries and Nomenclators10. The Case of Johannes Amos ComeniusPart D Reflections on the Topic11. Towards Mental Lexicography

Editorial Reviews

`This is a work of enormously broad scholarship, which brings together a range of quite diverse elements into a coherent narrative which makes for absorbing and often surprisingly entertaining reading. All in all this is a rich and multifaceted book, and one which will appeal to a variety ofaudiences.'David Cram, International Journal of Lexicography