English Grammar, Adapted To The Different Classes Of Learners; With An Appendix Containing Rules And Observations For Assisting The More Advanced Stud by Lindley MurrayEnglish Grammar, Adapted To The Different Classes Of Learners; With An Appendix Containing Rules And Observations For Assisting The More Advanced Stud by Lindley Murray

English Grammar, Adapted To The Different Classes Of Learners; With An Appendix Containing Rules…

byLindley Murray

Paperback | January 9, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1825. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... of the points, we roust distinguish between an imperfect phrase, a simple sentence, and a compound sentence. An imperfect phrase contains no assertion, or does not amount to a proposition or sentence : as, " Therefore; in haste; studious of praise." A simple sentence has but one subject, and one finite verb, expressed or implied : as, "Temperance preserves health." A compound sentence has more than one subject, or one finite verb, either expressed or understood; or it consists of two or more simple sentences connected together: as," Good nature mends and beautifies all objects;" "Virtue refines the affections, but vice debases them." In a sentence, the subject and the verb, or either of them, may be accompanied with several adjuncts: as, the object, the end, the circumstance of time, place, manner, and the like : and the subject or verb may be either immediately connected with them, or mediately ; that is, by being connected with something which is connected with some other, and so on : as, "The mind, unoccupied with useful knowledge, becomes a magazine oftrifles and follies." Members of sentences may be divided into simple and compound members. See page 101. CHAPTER I. OF THE COMMA. The Comma usually separates those parts of a sentence, which, thoush very closely connected in sense and construction, require a pause between them. v Rule I. With respect to a simple sentence, the several words of which it consists ht.ve so near a relation to each other, that in general, no points are requisite, except a full stop at the end of it: as. "The fear of the Lord is the. beginning of wisdom." "Every part of matter swarms with living creatures." A simple sentence, however, when it is a long one, and the nominative case is accompanied with inseparable adjuncts, may admit o...
Title:English Grammar, Adapted To The Different Classes Of Learners; With An Appendix Containing Rules…Format:PaperbackDimensions:102 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.21 inPublished:January 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217468837

ISBN - 13:9780217468831

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