English Grammar And Business Letter Writing; Condensed And Simplified, In Three Parts by Norman A. BarrettEnglish Grammar And Business Letter Writing; Condensed And Simplified, In Three Parts by Norman A. Barrett

English Grammar And Business Letter Writing; Condensed And Simplified, In Three Parts

byNorman A. Barrett

Paperback | October 24, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...bookseller and stationer." But if the nouns mean different persons or things, the definitive must be repeated; as, "A lawyer, a doctor, and a minister were present." Special Rule 2. The comparative degree is used when only two objects are compared; the superlative when more than two are brought into comparison; as, " Gold is heavier than iron;" "The greatest man of his age." Rem. 1. When the comparative degree is used, the latter term of comparison should always exclude the former; but when the superlative is used, the latter term should always include the former; as, "John is wiser than his brother;" "John is the wisest of the three boys." Rem. 2. Double forms of the comparative and superlative must not be used; thus, the strictest sect, not the most strictest sect; the worse result, not the worser result. Some of our older writers, when they wished to mark emphasis strongly, employed double comparatives and superlatives; but such constructions are contrary to modern usage. Special Rule 3. Definitive adjectives, when used with descriptives are generally placed first; as, "The old man;" "Ten small trees;" but after many, such, all, what, and both, the definitive stands next to the noun; so also after adjectives preceded by too, so, as, or how; as, " Many a man;" " Such a man;" " All the boys;" "What a boy;" "Both the girls;" "Too great, as great, so great, how great a man." EXERCISE 64. Correct violations of Rule X. and special rules following. 1. These kind of peaches are better than those. 2. These sort of fellows are very numerous. 3. This tidings will bring sorrow to the nation. 4. Not less than...
Title:English Grammar And Business Letter Writing; Condensed And Simplified, In Three PartsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:62 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.13 inPublished:October 24, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1231775289

ISBN - 13:9781231775288

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...bookseller and stationer." But if the nouns mean different persons or things, the definitive must be repeated; as, "A lawyer, a doctor, and a minister were present." Special Rule 2. The comparative degree is used when only two objects are compared; the superlative when more than two are brought into comparison; as, " Gold is heavier than iron;" "The greatest man of his age." Rem. 1. When the comparative degree is used, the latter term of comparison should always exclude the former; but when the superlative is used, the latter term should always include the former; as, "John is wiser than his brother;" "John is the wisest of the three boys." Rem. 2. Double forms of the comparative and superlative must not be used; thus, the strictest sect, not the most strictest sect; the worse result, not the worser result. Some of our older writers, when they wished to mark emphasis strongly, employed double comparatives and superlatives; but such constructions are contrary to modern usage. Special Rule 3. Definitive adjectives, when used with descriptives are generally placed first; as, "The old man;" "Ten small trees;" but after many, such, all, what, and both, the definitive stands next to the noun; so also after adjectives preceded by too, so, as, or how; as, " Many a man;" " Such a man;" " All the boys;" "What a boy;" "Both the girls;" "Too great, as great, so great, how great a man." EXERCISE 64. Correct violations of Rule X. and special rules following. 1. These kind of peaches are better than those. 2. These sort of fellows are very numerous. 3. This tidings will bring sorrow to the nation. 4. Not less than...