English Private Law

Hardcover | September 8, 2013

EditorAndrew Burrows

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Now in its third edition, this work has established itself as a key point of reference on English private law for lawyers in the UK and throughout the world. The book acts as an accessible first point of reference for practitioners approaching a private law issue for the first time, whilstsimultaneously providing a lucid, concise and authoritative overview of all the key areas of private law. This includes contract, tort, unjust enrichment, land law, trusts, intellectual property, succession, family, companies, insolvency, private international law and civil procedure. Each sectionis written by an acknowledged expert, using their experience and understanding to provide a clear distillation and analysis of the subject. This new edition includes all the recent developments since the publication of the second edition in 2007. It covers some areas that were previously not addressed including arbitration in civil procedure, the Human Rights Act 1998 in tort law, and regulatory reform in the light of the globalfinancial crisis. No other single text provides such comprehensive and lucid coverage of the whole of English private law as this one. It has come to be regarded as an essential item for every law library, reflecting its appeal to both English practitioners and those working in other jurisdictions. At the same timethe book's depth of analysis, combined with its ease of reference, make it a favourite among academics and students worldwide.

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Now in its third edition, this work has established itself as a key point of reference on English private law for lawyers in the UK and throughout the world. The book acts as an accessible first point of reference for practitioners approaching a private law issue for the first time, whilstsimultaneously providing a lucid, concise and a...

Andrew Burrows, FBA, QC (Hon) is Professor of the Law of England and Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is also a Barrister and Honorary Bencher of Middle Temple.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:1704 pagesPublished:September 8, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199661774

ISBN - 13:9780199661770

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Table of Contents

PART I: SOURCES OF LAW1. Professor John Bell: Sources of LawPART II: THE LAW OF PERSONS2. Professor Jonathan Herring: Family3. Professor John Armour: Companies and Other AssociationsPART III: THE LAW OF PROPERTY4. Mr William Swadling: Property: General Principles5. Professor Lionel Smith: Security6. Professor Graeme Dinwoodie and Professor William Cornish: Intellectual Property7. Professor Roger Kerridge: SuccessionPART IV: THE LAW OF OBLIGATIONS8. Professor Ewan McKendrick: Contract: In General9. Professor Francis Reynolds: Agency10. Professor Ewan McKendrick: Sale of Goods11. Professor Francis Rose: Carriage of Goods by Sea12. Professor Malcolm Clarke: Carriage of Goods by Air and Land13. Professor Malcolm Clarke: Insurance14. Professor Richard Hooley: Banking15. Professor Mark Freedland: Employment16. Professor Norman Palmer: Bailment17. Mr Donal Nolan and Mr John Davies: Torts and Equitable Wrongs18. Professor Charles Mitchell: Unjust EnrichmentPART V: LITIGATION19. Professor Michael Bridge: Insolvency20. Professor Adrian Briggs: Private International Law21. Professor Andrew Burrows: Judicial Remedies22. Professor Neil Andrews: Civil Procedure

Editorial Reviews

"Foreign lawyers now have a readily accessible account of English law. Students wishing to obtain an overview of a topic either before or after studying it are well served. Practising lawyers may also want an introduction to an unfamiliar topic or an account of a particular area to get theirbearings. The difficult question will not be why this book was written but how we coped without it." --Robert Stevens, Professor of Commercial Law, UCL