Enterprise SOA: Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices by Dirk KrafzigEnterprise SOA: Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices by Dirk Krafzig

Enterprise SOA: Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices

byDirk Krafzig, Karl Banke, Dirk Slama

Paperback | November 9, 2004

Pricing and Purchase Info

$64.35 online 
$71.50 list price save 10%
Earn 322 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Foreword Foreword At the turn of the nineteenth century, a wave of new technologies such as the steam engine, electricity, the loom, the railway, and the telephone emerged. Urbanization and the mass production of goods in large factories fundamentally changed how mankind lived and worked together. One hundred years later, the industrial revolution had not slowed down: At the turn of the twentieth century, automation, specialization, and a never-ending spiral of efficiency improvement have resulted in modern economies with unheard-of industrial productivity. After a phase of consolidation during the transition from the twentieth to the twenty-first century, globalization and virtualization have now become the key drivers of our economic lives. Without a doubt, they will yet again change how we live and work together. If we take a closer look at the past 20 years, we can observe that established business rules have been constantly redefined. New business models emerged; small companies quickly grew into billion-dollar multinationals, aggressively attacking other established companies. A wave of mergers, acquisitions, and buyouts changed the overall industrial landscape. IT has played a major role in all of this, be it through controlling production processes and supply chains or by creating real-time links between financial markets, thus virtually eliminating arbitrage opportunities by closing the time gaps of trading around the globe. The Internet boom and the "virtual enterprise" are cornerstones of this ongoing development. Entirely new products and services have been created, which would have been unthinkable without the support of modern IT. Without a doubt, today s modern enterprises are completely dependent on their IT. Consequently, today s IT is driven by the same dynamics as the enterprise itself. Today, we expect an extremely high level of flexibility and agility from our enterprise IT. During the post Internet-boom years, cost efficiency quickly became another key requirement, if not the most important one. Enterprise IT has changed as a result of the constantly increasing pressure. In the early days of enterprise computing, IT was merely responsible for providing storage and processing capacity, with more and more business logic being added throughout the decades. During the different boom phases in the 1980s and 1990s, a plethora of new applications emerged, often side by side with the information silos that had been developed in the previous 20 years. Today, the increasing cost pressure is forcing us to efficiently reuse existing systems while also developing new functionality and constantly adapting to changing business requirements. The term "legacy system" is now often replaced with "heritage system" in order to emphasize the value that lies in the existing systems. The increases in reuse and harmonization requirements have been fueled by the urgency of integrating the historically grown IT landscapes in order to improve IT efficiency and agility. As a result, we could observe at a technical level the emergence of middleware tools and Enterprise Application Integration EAI platforms in what can be seen as a post-RDBMS phase. While a lot of trial-and-error projects were executed in the 1990s, with more or less high levels of success, the development of EAI and middleware concepts has now been culminated in the principles of Service-Oriented Architecture SOA , which can be seen as an important evolutionary point in the development of integration technologies. What is important about SOA is that it has taken away the focus from fine-grained, technology-oriented entities such as database rows or Java objects, focusing instead on business-centric services with business-level transaction granularity. Furthermore, SOA is not an enterprise technology standard, meaning it is not dependent on a single technical protocol such as IIOP or SOAP. Instead, it represents an architectural blueprint, which can incorporate many different technologies and does not require specific protocols or bridging technologies. The focus is on defining cleanly cut service contracts with a clear business orientation. At the Winterthur, as in any other large company, we have been facing all of the preceding issues of historically grown systems and information silos. We had to find a solution to increase our IT efficiency and agility. The Winterthur, with approximately 20,000 employees worldwide and over 130 billion Swiss franks of assets being managed as of December 31, 2003 , is a leading Swiss insurance company. As is the case with any well-organized company, we rely on our IT infrastructure to manage assets, products, processes, customers, partners, employees, and any other aspect of business life. Our core business systems are based on highly reliable mainframe computers that we invested in over the past decades. However, like most other enterprises relying on mainframes for their back-end systems, we saw the increasing need over the years to open up these back-end systems. The main reason for this was to enable reuse of the core business logic and data on these systems for new Internet and intranet front-end systems on nonmainframe platforms such as UNIX and Windows. To facilitate this development, we built up an application and integration platform, which laid the technical basis for Winterthur s SOA. While the initial development started off at our core Swiss market unit, the platform is nowadays reused abroad, because of its success and the prevailing analogous technical requirements of other market units. Thus, we create the basis to realize synergies and enhance our international initiatives. Building on our technical platform, combined with our in-house experience in the area of SOA and with the experience that our holding company Credit Suisse Group has gathered in similar re-architectural efforts, we have been extremely successful. The Winterthur SOA has achieved the goal of opening up our back-end systems in new application development areas on other platforms. A solid SOA-based architectural approach is at the heart of our IT strategy. This book is important because it provides enterprise architects with a roadmap for the successful establishment of SOA at the enterprise level. While a lot of the underlying principles of the original Winterthur SOA have had to be derived from past experience and intuition due to lack of SOA literature at the time, this book provides a concrete guide, blueprints, and best practices for SOA architects. In addition to the Winterthur case study in chapter 15, you will find many more concrete examples of how large corporations have started to adopt the principles of SOA in their IT architectures. It is also very important that this book not only focuses on the technical aspects of SOA, but also places strong emphasis on the delicate issues of establishing SOA at the enterprise level, truly deserving the title Enterprise SOA. The SOA principles described in this book are the foundation on which enterprises can build an IT architecture that will satisfy today s most important IT requirements-agility and flexibility-at affordable costs. Martin Frick, Head of IT at the Winterthur Group /> Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.
About the Authors Dirk Krafzig Dirk has been dealing with the challenges of enterprise IT and distributed software architectures throughout his entire working life. He devoted himself to SOA in 2001 when he joined Shinka Technologies, a start-up company and platform vendor in the early days of XML-based Web services. Since then, Dirk ...
Loading
Title:Enterprise SOA: Service-Oriented Architecture Best PracticesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:408 pages, 9 × 7 × 0.9 inPublished:November 9, 2004Publisher:Pearson EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0131465759

ISBN - 13:9780131465756

Reviews

From the Author

Reader's GuideThe reader's guide provides an indication as to who should read this book and the benefits to be gained. A summary of each chapter provides an overview of the stepbystep approach required for the successful introduction of ServiceOriented Architectures (SOA).Who Should Read This BookThis book is aimed at the various stakeholders of enterprise software architectures, including software architects and evangelists, designers, analysts, developers, members of IT strategy departments, project managers, representatives of product vendors, and those interested in software architecture and its relation to structures and processes within largescale organizations. Furthermore, this book is an excellent introduction to the real world of commercial computing for students in a variety of disciplines. If you are a Software Architect, this book provides you with handson guidelines for the design of SOAs. You will find the definition of an SOA together with its key terms as we distinguish the SOA from approaches such as component architectures and software buses. Furthermore, this book provides concrete guidance for the most important design decisions one will encounter in practice. These guidelines comprise identifying services, assigning the appropriate service type and allocating the ownership of data to services. You will also discover how to utilize expansion stages in order to enable stepwise SOA introduction. This book also provides valuable advice on the design of a functional infrastructure for business processes and on how to achieve process integrity, approach heterogeneity, and initiate the technical infrastructure. We discuss these guidelines with respect to different application types, including Web applications, fat clients, mobile applications, EAI, and multichannel applications. For the purpose of software architects, Chapters 4 to 10 are most valuable. In addition, Chapter 13, which covers SOA project management, will be very helpful in ensuring an efficient collaboration within an SOA project. Finally, the case studies in Part III give you practical examples of how architects in other organizations introduced an SOA.Do you see yourself in the role of an SOA Evangelist? If you intend to implement an SOA within your own organization, you must successfully promote your ideas. Most importantly, you must be able to communicate the benefits of the SOA to all stakeholders of the application landscape within your organization. Chapter 11 will be of special interest to you because it presents the key benefits of SOA for the organization and each individual stakeholder. In addition, Chapter 12 provides an indepth description of the steps required to set up an SOA, with considerable practiceoriented advice as to the introduction of appropriate processes and boards. After reading this book, you should have a deeper understanding of SOAs, enabling you to effectively argue the benefits to different stakeholders and to establish the necessary processes and boards to make your SOA endeavor a success!If you are a Software Designer, Analyst, or Developer working in an SOA project, although you are likely to work in a specific part of your application landscape, this book will help you obtain a better understanding of the entire process. Furthermore, there are key challenges such as process integrity that directly impact your work. This book—in particular Chapters 7 to 10—helps to address these challenges in a coordinated manner within your SOA project. If you work in the IT Strategy department of an large organization, you should read this book in order to find out how SOAs can add to your IT strategy. Your work is likely to be driven by the demand for agility and cost effectiveness. Many enterprises have experienced projects that failed to deliver the required functionality and therefore lost business opportunities. Furthermore, many application landscapes suffer from high maintenance costs for their inherited assets and the integration of new applications. In Part II (Chapters 1113) you will read about the various possibilities for overcoming these issues with an SOA. Finally, several strategies for introducing the SOA within the organization are presented. Part III (Chapters 14 to 17) contains several case studies with realworld evidence that validates the SOA approach. Those success stories provide "living proof" of SOA success and offer an impression of the different ways an SOA can be established.If you are an experienced Project Manager, you should read this book in order to understand the specific benefits of SOAs for project management. The SOA approach implies a major simplification of the overall software development process, and this book makes these benefits accessible. However, SOAs will challenge you, and as a result, this book presents solutions to the most important problems one encounters in an SOA project, both from the technical and project management viewpoints. You will find Chapter 13, which focuses on project management, and Chapters 11 and 12, which depict the political environment, to be most beneficial. It should be noted that this book does not introduce a new software development methodology. You will require a sound knowledge of your organization's favorite methodology, accompanied with endurance, social competence, political cleverness, and management skills. This book will complement these skills so that they can be successfully applied in an SOA project. For a vendor of standard software packages, this book presents valuable guidance for product management and sales. SOAs will soon gain tremendous importance in the enterprise software market. As a salesperson or a product manager, you need to understand the requirements of your enterprise customers in order to be able to offer solutions that fit your customer's needs. In particular, Chapter 11 will be very beneficial because it depicts the benefits of serviceoriented software from the viewpoint of the various stakeholders. Being able to offer serviceoriented software implies a significant competitive advantage. The inherent strength of SOAs will become the strength of your product. It enables you to sell sophisticated vertical solutions, generating product revenues for your company without the burden of high integration costs that inhibit the sales process. A Roadmap for This BookThe successful adoption of an Enterprise SOA is based on three fundamental factors: architecture, organization, and lessons drawn from realworld experience. The IT architecture is the technical enabler for an SOA. A successful SOA adoption accelerates an enterprise by reducing the gap between strategy and process changes on one hand and supporting IT systems on the other. The IT architecture and the business organization are mutually dependent, although they both drive each other. Finally, realworld experience, in particular previous longterm IT infrastructure initiatives (both successful and unsuccessful) influence and validate many of the core concepts of serviceorientated architectures. Not surprisingly, this book is structured around these three factors. After we introduce the subject area in Chapters 1 to 3, Part I, Chapters 4 to 10, focuses on the architecture. Part II, Chapters 11 to 13, discusses the challenges of introducing an SOA at the level of the organization, depicting its benefits, processes, and project management. Part III, Chapters 14 to 17, provides reallife examples of successful SOA introductions.Chapter 1, "An Enterprise IT Renovation Roadmap," identifies the need for agility and cost savings as the main drivers for the introduction of SOAs. Chapter 2, "The Evolution of the Service Concept," describes how commercial information technology has moved toward the service concept over the last 40 years. Today's SOA is the preliminary endpoint of many years of painful "testing." Knowing and understanding previous pitfalls and mistakes help to avoid them in new projects.Chapter 3, "Inventory of Distributed Computing Concepts," introduces the fundamental concepts of distributed computing that are required for subsequent discussions in Part I (Chapters 410). Particular topics will be communication infrastructures, synchronous vs. asynchronous communication, payload semantics, granularity, and loose vs. tight coupling.  PART 1: Architectural RoadmapChapter 4, "ServiceOriented Architectures," describes the particular requirements of large organizations for building an architecture and defines the term "ServiceOriented Architecture" as it is used throughout this book.Chapter 5, "Services as Building Blocks," is a direct continuation of Chapter 4. It introduces different service types—namely basic, intermediary, processcentric, and external services—and gives an indepth discussion of their key characteristics.Chapter 6, "The Architectural Roadmap," completes the discussion started in Chapter 5. Using the concept of building blocks, the highlevel structure of SOAs is depicted. Chapter 6 introduces two key concepts: SOA layers and expansion stages. SOA layers aim to organize the aforementioned services at the enterprise level. Expansion stages are welldefined levels of maturity of an SOA that enable a stepwise implementation. In this book, three expansion stages are distinguished: fundamental SOA, networked SOA, and processenabled SOA.Chapter 7, "SOA and Business Process Management," shows how SOAs and BPM can complement each other in practice. This chapter draws a demarcation line between the responsibilities of a BPM infrastructure and the functional infrastructure provided by the SOA.Chapter 8, "Process Integrity," delves into the challenges of distributed architectures with respect to consistency and how SOAs approach this major issue. This chapter provides numerous helpful, handson guidelines tackling realworld constraints such as heterogeneity, changing requirements, or budget.Chapter 9, "Infrastructure of a Service Bus." By this point, the reader will know a lot about service types, the handling of business processes, and SOA layers. This chapter will address the issue of the type of runtime infrastructure that is required in order to put an SOA in place—an infrastructure that is commonly known as the "Service Bus." Chapter 9 highlights the fact that the Service Bus is often heterogeneous and provides technical services such as data transport, logging, and security. Chapter 10, "SOA in Action," discusses how SOAs apply to specific application types such as Web applications, EAI, fat clients, mobile devices, and multichannel applications.  PART 2: Organizational RoadmapChapter 11, "Motivation and Benefits," provides a number of important reasons as to why an organization should implement an SOA. It depicts the benefits for the organization as well as for the individual stakeholders. Chapter 12, "The Organizational SOA Roadmap," names four pillars for the success of an SOA introduction at the enterprise level—namely, budget, initial project, team, and buddies. This chapter deals with challenges such as conflicts of interests of different stakeholders or financing the overheads of the SOA infrastructure and gives practical advice on how to overcome these obstacles. Chapter 13, "Project Management," provides best practices of SOA project management. Most importantly, this chapter depicts how service contracts can drive the entire development effort. It shows how different tasks can be decoupled and synchronized at the same time and how complexity and risk can be reduced. Furthermore, this chapter describes testing, configuration management, risk assessment, and estimating costs and delivery dates.  PART 3: RealWorld ExperienceChapter 15, "Case Study: Deutsche Post AG." The Deutsche Post World Net is a multinational group comprising three main brands and more than 275,000 employees. The SOA was set up for the Mail Corporate division at Deutsche Post, a partner to three million business customers, providing services to 39 million households through 81,000 delivery staff, 13,000 retail outlets, 3,500 delivery bases, and 140,000 letterboxes. The SOA at Deutsche Post AG covers a mainly Javabased environment. This fact indicates that a SOA can also be beneficial in homogeneous environments. Chapter 15, "Case Study: Winterthur." Winterthur Group, a leading Swiss insurance company, has approximately 23,000 employees worldwide achieving a premium volume of 33.5 billion Swiss Francs in 2003. In 1998, Winterthur's Market Unit Switzerland developed a concept for an Application Service Platform. Since then, this integration platform, called "ePlatform," has been implemented and used as the technological basis for the realization of a SOA. Today, the SOA includes most of the missioncritical business applications. Its technical focus is on mainframebased CORBA services. Wellorganized processes and a service repository have been recognized as key success factors at Winterthur.Chapter 16, "Case Study: Credit Suisse." Credit Suisse Group is a leading global financial services company operating in more than 50 countries with about 60,000 staff. Credit Suisse reported assets under management of 1,199 billion Swiss Francs in December 2003. The SOA was initially implemented in order to create multichannel banking applications and online trading portals. In addition, the SOA was utilized to consolidate the core business application portfolio. Credit Suisse has implemented three different service buses in order to approach the different requirements of synchronous communication, asynchronous communication, and bulk data transfer. Chapter 17, "Case Study: Intelligent Finance." Halifax Bank of Scotland (HBoS) is a UK Financial Services provider with divisions in Retail Banking, Insurance & Investment, Business Banking, Corporate Banking, and Treasury. HBoS is the UK's largest mortgage and savings provider with a customer base of about 22 million. Intelligent Finance was launched as a division of Halifax plc with the aim of attracting new customers from outside Halifax and specifically to target the UK clearing banks. Intelligent Finance was launched as Project Greenfield in 2000, starting an entire new banking operation from scratch, based on an SOA. Three years later, by the end of 2003, Intelligent Finance had 820,000 customer accounts, representing assets of £15.5 billion. The Intelligent Finance system was probably one of the largest and most advanced early SOA deployments in the financial services industry in Europe.© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read from the Book

Foreword At the turn of the nineteenth century, a wave of new technologies such as the steam engine, electricity, the loom, the railway, and the telephone emerged. Urbanization and the mass production of goods in large factories fundamentally changed how mankind lived and worked together. One hundred years later, the industrial revolution had not slowed down: At the turn of the twentieth century, automation, specialization, and a never-ending spiral of efficiency improvement have resulted in modern economies with unheard-of industrial productivity. After a phase of consolidation during the transition from the twentieth to the twenty-first century, globalization and virtualization have now become the key drivers of our economic lives. Without a doubt, they will yet again change how we live and work together. If we take a closer look at the past 20 years, we can observe that established business rules have been constantly redefined. New business models emerged; small companies quickly grew into billion-dollar multinationals, aggressively attacking other established companies. A wave of mergers, acquisitions, and buyouts changed the overall industrial landscape. IT has played a major role in all of this, be it through controlling production processes and supply chains or by creating real-time links between financial markets, thus virtually eliminating arbitrage opportunities by closing the time gaps of trading around the globe. The Internet boom and the "virtual enterprise" are cornerstones of this ongoing development. Entirely new products and services have been created, which would have been unthinkable without the support of modern IT. Without a doubt, today's modern enterprises are completely dependent on their IT. Consequently, today's IT is driven by the same dynamics as the enterprise itself. Today, we expect an extremely high level of flexibility and agility from our enterprise IT. During the post Internet-boom years, cost efficiency quickly became another key requirement, if not the most important one. Enterprise IT has changed as a result of the constantly increasing pressure. In the early days of enterprise computing, IT was merely responsible for providing storage and processing capacity, with more and more business logic being added throughout the decades. During the different boom phases in the 1980s and 1990s, a plethora of new applications emerged, often side by side with the information silos that had been developed in the previous 20 years. Today, the increasing cost pressure is forcing us to efficiently reuse existing systems while also developing new functionality and constantly adapting to changing business requirements. The term "legacy system" is now often replaced with "heritage system" in order to emphasize the value that lies in the existing systems. The increases in reuse and harmonization requirements have been fueled by the urgency of integrating the historically grown IT landscapes in order to improve IT efficiency and agility. As a result, we could observe at a technical level the emergence of middleware tools and Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) platforms in what can be seen as a post-RDBMS phase. While a lot of trial-and-error projects were executed in the 1990s, with more or less high levels of success, the development of EAI and middleware concepts has now been culminated in the principles of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), which can be seen as an important evolutionary point in the development of integration technologies. What is important about SOA is that it has taken away the focus from fine-grained, technology-oriented entities such as database rows or Java objects, focusing instead on business-centric services with business-level transaction granularity. Furthermore, SOA is not an enterprise technology standard, meaning it is not dependent on a single technical protocol such as IIOP or SOAP. Instead, it represents an architectural blueprint, which can incorporate many different technologies and does not require specific protocols or bridging technologies. The focus is on defining cleanly cut service contracts with a clear business orientation. At the Winterthur, as in any other large company, we have been facing all of the preceding issues of historically grown systems and information silos. We had to find a solution to increase our IT efficiency and agility. The Winterthur, with approximately 20,000 employees worldwide and over 130 billion Swiss franks of assets being managed (as of December 31, 2003), is a leading Swiss insurance company. As is the case with any well-organized company, we rely on our IT infrastructure to manage assets, products, processes, customers, partners, employees, and any other aspect of business life. Our core business systems are based on highly reliable mainframe computers that we invested in over the past decades. However, like most other enterprises relying on mainframes for their back-end systems, we saw the increasing need over the years to open up these back-end systems. The main reason for this was to enable reuse of the core business logic and data on these systems for new Internet and intranet front-end systems on nonmainframe platforms such as UNIX and Windows. To facilitate this development, we built up an application and integration platform, which laid the technical basis for Winterthur's SOA. While the initial development started off at our core Swiss market unit, the platform is nowadays reused abroad, because of its success and the prevailing analogous technical requirements of other market units. Thus, we create the basis to realize synergies and enhance our international initiatives. Building on our technical platform, combined with our in-house experience in the area of SOA and with the experience that our holding company Credit Suisse Group has gathered in similar re-architectural efforts, we have been extremely successful. The Winterthur SOA has achieved the goal of opening up our back-end systems in new application development areas on other platforms. A solid SOA-based architectural approach is at the heart of our IT strategy. This book is important because it provides enterprise architects with a roadmap for the successful establishment of SOA at the enterprise level. While a lot of the underlying principles of the original Winterthur SOA have had to be derived from past experience and intuition due to lack of SOA literature at the time, this book provides a concrete guide, blueprints, and best practices for SOA architects. In addition to the Winterthur case study in chapter 15, you will find many more concrete examples of how large corporations have started to adopt the principles of SOA in their IT architectures. It is also very important that this book not only focuses on the technical aspects of SOA, but also places strong emphasis on the delicate issues of establishing SOA at the enterprise level, truly deserving the title Enterprise SOA. The SOA principles described in this book are the foundation on which enterprises can build an IT architecture that will satisfy today's most important IT requirements—agility and flexibility—at affordable costs. Martin Frick, Head of IT at the Winterthur Group © Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Reader’s Guide.

Chapter 1 - An Enterprise IT Renovation Roadmap.

1.1 - Agony Versus Agility.

1.2 - Enterprise Software Is a Different Animal.

1.3 - The Importance of Enterprise Software Architectures.

1.4 - The Requirements for an Enterprise Software Architecture.

1.5 - The Relation of Enterprise Architecture and Enterprise Standards.

1.6 - Organizational Aspects.

1.7 - Lifelong Learning.

1.8 - The Enterprise IT Renovation Roadmap.

Chapter 2 - Evolution of the Service Concept.

2.1 - Milestones of Enterprise Computing.

2.2 - Programming Paradigms

2.3 - Distributed Computing

2.4 - Business Computing

2.5 - Conclusion

References

URLs

Chapter 3 - Inventory of Distributed Computing Concepts.

3.1 - Heterogeneity of Communication Mechanisms

3.2 - Communication Middleware

3.3 - Synchrony

3.4 - Interface Versus Payload Semantics

3.5 - Tight Versus Loose Coupling

3.6 - Conclusion

References

URLs

PART I - ARCHITECTURAL ROADMAP.

Chapter 4 - Service-Oriented Architectures.

4.1 - What Is a Software Architecture?

4.2 - What Is a Service-Oriented Architecture?

4.3 - Elements of a Service-Oriented Architecture

4.4 - Conclusion

References

URLs

Chapter 5 - Services as Building Blocks.

5.1 - Service Types

5.2 - Layers on the Enterprise Level

5.3 - Conclusion

References

Chapter 6 - The Architectural Roadmap.

6.1 - The Architectural Roadmap

6.2 - Fundamental SOA

6.3 - Networked SOA

6.4 - Process-Enabled SOA

6.5 - Conclusion

Chapter 7 - SOA and Business Process Management.

7.1 - Introduction to BPM

7.2 - BPM and the Process-Enabled SOA

7.3 - Conclusion

References

URLs

Chapter 8 - Managing Process Integrity.

8.1 - Data Versus Process Integrity

8.2 - Technical Concepts and Solutions

8.3 - Recommendations for SOA Architects

8.4 - Conclusion

References

Chapter 9 - Infrastructure of the Service Bus.

9.1 - Software Buses and the Service Bus

9.2 - Logging and Auditing

9.3 - Availability and Scalability

9.4 - Securing SOAs

9.5 - Conclusion

References

URLs

Chapter 10 - SOA in Action.

10.1 - Building Web Applications

10.2 - Enterprise Application Integration

10.3 - Business-to-Business

10.4 - Fat Clients

10.5 - Designing for Small Devices

10.6 - Multi-Channel Applications

10.7 - Conclusion

References

URLs

PART II - ORGANIZATIONAL ROADMAP.

Chapter 11 - Motivation and Benefits.

11.1 - The Enterprise Perspective

11.2 - The Personal Perspective

11.3 - Conclusion

References

URLs

Chapter 12 - The Organizational SOA Roadmap.

12.1 - Stakeholders and Potential Conflicts of Interest

12.2 - The Organizational SOA Roadmap

12.3 - Four Pillars for Success

12.4 - An Ideal World

12.5 - The Real World–Organization-Wide Standards

12.6 - Recommendations for the SOA Protagonist

12.7 - Conclusion

URLs

Chapter 13 - SOA-Driven Project Management.

13.1 - Established Project Management Methodologies

13.2 - SOA-Driven Project Management

13.3 - Configuration Management

13.4 - Testing

13.5 - Conclusion

References

URLs

PART III - REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE.

Chapter 14 - Deutsche Post AG Case Study.

14.1 - Project Scope

14.2 - Implementation

14.3 - Technology

14.4 - Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Perspectives

References

Links

Chapter 15 - Winterthur Case Study.

15.1 - Project Scope

15.2 - Implementation

15.3 - Technology

15.4 - Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Perspectives

Chapter 16 - Credit Suisse Case Study.

16.1 - Project Scope

16.2 - Implementation

16.3 - Technology

16.4 - Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Perspectives

References

Chapter 17 - Halifax Bank Of Scotland: IF.com.

17.1 - Project Scope

17.2 - Implementation

17.3 - Technology

17.4 - Lessons Learned, Benefits, and Perspectives

URLs

Index.