Epic in Republican Rome by Sander M. Goldberg

Epic in Republican Rome

bySander M. Goldberg

Hardcover | July 1, 1994

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This book is a major new study of the epic poetry of Republican Rome. Goldberg treats the creators of these now-fragmentary works not simply as predecessors of Vergil, but as pioneers and poets in their own right. But Goldberg goes beyond practical criticism, exploring in the literaryexperiments of Andronicus, Naevius, Ennius, and Cicero issues of poetry and patronage, cultural assimilation and national ideology, modeling and originality that both come to characterize Roman literature of all periods and continue to shape modern responses to that literature. What emerges fromGoldberg's study is both a fresh perspective on Vergil's achievement and new insights into the cultural dynamics of second-century Rome.

About The Author

Sander M. Goldberg is at University of California, Los Angeles.
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Title:Epic in Republican RomeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 9.49 × 6.38 × 0.79 inPublished:July 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195093720

ISBN - 13:9780195093728

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"Excellent....Epic in Republican Rome sets out to consider the teleological fallacy, by studying the remains of the lost epics of Livius Andronicus, Naevius, Ennius and Cicero, and doing justice to them in their own terms."--Times Literary Supplement