Epistemology and the Psychology of Human Judgment

Paperback | February 17, 2005

byMichael A Bishop, J. D. Trout

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Bishop and Trout here present a unique and provocative new approach to epistemology (the theory of human knowledge and reasoning). Their approach aims to liberate epistemology from the scholastic debates of standard analytic epistemology, and treat it as a branch of the philosophy of science.The approach is novel in its use of cost-benefit analysis to guide people facing real reasoning problems and in its framework for resolving normative disputes in psychology. Based on empirical data, Bishop and Trout show how people can improve their reasoning by relying on Statistical PredictionRules (SPRs). They then develop and articulate the positive core of the book. Their view, Strategic Reliabilism, claims that epistemic excellence consists in the efficient allocation of cognitive resources to reliable reasoning strategies, applied to significant problems. The last third of the bookdevelops the implications of this view for standard analytic epistemology; for resolving normative disputes in psychology; and for offering practical, concrete advice on how this theory can improve real people's reasoning. This is a truly distinctive and controversial work that spans many disciplines and will speak to an unusually diverse group, including people in epistemology, philosophy of science, decision theory, cognitive and clinical psychology, and ethics and public policy.

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Bishop and Trout here present a unique and provocative new approach to epistemology (the theory of human knowledge and reasoning). Their approach aims to liberate epistemology from the scholastic debates of standard analytic epistemology, and treat it as a branch of the philosophy of science.The approach is novel in its use of cost-ben...

Michael Bishop is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Northern Illinois University. His work has appeared in journals such as Philosophy of Science, Nous, American Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophical Studies, and Synthese. J. D. Trout is Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor at the Parmly Hearing Institute, Loyola Univer...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 5.39 × 8.19 × 0.59 inPublished:February 17, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195162307

ISBN - 13:9780195162301

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Laying Our Cards on the Table2. The Amazing Success of Statistical Predication Rules3. Extracting Epistemic Lessons from Ameliorative Psychology4. Strategic Reliabilism: Robust Reliability5. Strategic Reliabilism: The Costs and Benefits of Excellent Judgment6. Strategic Reliabilism: Epistemic Significance7. The Troubles with Standard Analytic Epistemology8. Putting Epistemology into Practice: Normative Disputes in Psychology9. Putting Epistemology into Practice: Positive Advice10. ConclusionAppendix: Objections and RepliesReferencesIndex

Editorial Reviews

"Bishop and Trout have written a wonderful book. Their goal is nothing less than a radical reorientation of contemporary epistemology. Rejecting the analytic enterprise of explicating our concepts of justification and knowledge, they instead seek a return to an epistemology which would providerules for the direction of the mind. Empirically informed and philosophically sophisticated, this is a lively and challenging book."--Hilary Kornblith, Professor of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst